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Glenwood man arrested on drug charges, Saturday

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

Police in Glenwood report the arrest on Saturday of a local man, on drug charges. 25-year old Marcus Armstrong, of Glenwood, faces charges that include OWI/1st Offense, Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Failure to Affix a Drug Tax Stamp. Armstrong’s bond was set at $7,300 altogether.

Glenwood Police are also investigating a property damage, hit-and-run incident. Officials say at around 8:45-p.m., Saturday, an unknown vehicle struck a mailbox in the 900 block of north Locust Street, in Glenwood, knocking the box off its post. A broken, passenger side mirror was found about 10-feet north of the mailbox. Authorities think the mirror came from a car or small SUV. The victim claimed her white, metal and plastic mailbox was valued at about $500.

Fremont County Sheriff’s report, 2/23/15

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

Sheriff’s officials in Fremont County have released a report on recent arrests and incidents. Officials say on Feb. 18th, 36-year old Christopher Lynn Rakes, of Shenandoah, was arrested for Possession of drug paraphernalia. That same day, 51-year old Kelli Rachelle Gould, of Shenandoah, was arrested on a Fremont County warrant for Probation Revocation.

On Feb. 13th, 39-year old Forrest Wayne King, of Tabor, was arrested in Fremont County for Driving Under Suspension and failure to have insurance. On Feb. 12th, 32-year old Jeffrey Dale Hankins, of Tabor, was arrested for Theft in the 5th degree, and Public Intoxication. And on Feb. 8th, 65-year old John Thomas Davis, of Hamburg, was arrested for Domestic Abuse assault.

The Fremont County Sheriff’s Office said also, a Hamburg man was transported by private vehicle to the Grape Community Hospital on Feb. 13th, following a rollover accident. Authorities say James Clark was traveling south on Bluff Road when his pickup drifted off the roadway and he over-corrected.  The 1993 Chevy flipped onto its side and slid into the east ditch.

Break-in reported at Anita Municipal Utilities

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

Authorities in Cass County were called to investigate a break-in that occurred over the weekend, in Anita. According to dispatch reports, officials with Anita Municipal Utilities called the Sheriff’s Office this morning to report their office had been entered and cash taken from a file cabinet. No other information is currently available.

(Podcast) KJAN News, 2/23/2015

News, Podcasts

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

The 8-a.m. Newscast w/KJAN News Director Ric Hanson.

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2 arrested Sunday, in Creston

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

Police in Creston report two people were arrested, Sunday. 39-year old Timothy Michael Vandevender, of Corning, was arrested at around 5:40-p.m. at U-S Highway 34 and Abell Street in Creston, on a charge of OWI/1st offense. He was later released on $1,000 bond. And, 31-year old Alicia Ellen Lovell, of Creston, was arrested at Highway 34 and Oak Street, in Creston, on a charge of Driving While Suspended. She was later released on $300 bond.

The Creston P-D reports also, a resident on west Montgomery Street reported last Friday that someone had operated his vehicle without consent, and stole a 20-volt impact wrench, two sockets and a two and a-half ton floor jack. The loss was estimated at $810.

(8-a.m. News)

(Podcast) KJAN News & funeral report, 2/23/2015

News, Podcasts

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

The 7:06-a.m. report w/KJAN News Director Ric Hanson

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Red Oak man arrested on assault charge

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

Authorities in Montgomery County report a Red Oak man was arrested Sunday night, on an assault charge. 34-year old Brent Matthew Harold was arrested at around 8:50-p.m. for Domestic Assault. Harold was booked into the Montgomery County Jail and held without bond.

Iowa News Headlines: Mon., 2/23/15

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

Here is the latest Iowa news from The Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A high school wrestler from southwest Iowa who collapsed and went into cardiac arrest at the state duals tournament has been released from a Des Moines hospital. Spokesman Gregg Lagan for Mercy Medical Center said last night that Creston/Orient-Macksburg student Tayler Pettit is heading home. Tayler’s parents Scott and Melissa Pettit said in the statement that doctors found Tayler has a previously unknown condition in which an extra electrical pathway in his heart caused a rapid heart rate.

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Governor Terry Branstad has suggested Iowa residents could one day buy cannabis oil in neighboring Illinois, a move that industry experts say has major legislative roadblocks if it’s ever seriously considered. Branstad recently said he was open to working with officials in Illinois, which has a pilot program to produce and distribute medical marijuana.

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The federal government predicts that trains hauling crude oil or ethanol will derail an average of 10 times a year over the next two decades. The projection was contained in a Department of Transportation analysis from last July.

DUBUQUE, Iowa (AP) — The trial over plans to develop a sports complex at the “Field of Dreams” movie site in eastern Iowa is underway. Neighboring landowners filed the lawsuit to challenge the way Dyersville city officials decided to rezone the area around the site for commercial use. The trial began last Monday and was expected to last seven days.

Gas tax bill may come up for debate in House, Senate this week

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

It appears a bill that would raise the state gas tax by a dime a gallon in on the fast track at the statehouse. The bill is eligible for debate in the Iowa House on Tuesday. Last Thursday, House Speaker Kraig Paulsen, a Republican from Hiawatha, used his authority to replace two members on a key House Committee who opposed the bill. His moves ensured the bill passed on a 13-to-12 vote, but they also heightened the ire of the bill’s opponents. Drew Klein, the Iowa director of Americans for Prosperity, accuses Paulsen of favoring road builders over Iowans in general.

“Leadership is clearly more interested in appeasing special interest groups that have been funding the movement than in looking for ways to shield the taxpayer,” he said. A Des Moines Register “Iowa Poll” released this weekend found that while 61 percent of Iowans consider the deteriorating condition of Iowa’s roads and bridges to be an issue lawmakers should address, Iowans are evenly divided over idea of raising the state gas tax. The poll found 48 percent support the move and 50 percent oppose it. Senate Republican Leader Bill Dix of Shell Rock has been among those who opposed the idea of raising the state gas tax in the past, but he suggests a majority of Republicans and Democrats in the legislature now agree it’s the best means to plug a shortfall in the state fund that finances transportation projects.

“We need to find additional resources to get it into the road funding, to solve those long-term problems, and I’m prepared to cast a vote in favor of it,” Dix says. For the past four years the Iowa Farm Bureau have been lobbying for a gas tax increase, citing the closure of roads and bridges that create long detours for farmers and rural residents. Over 200 Farm Bureau members were at the statehouse last week to lobby legislators on the issue. And earlier this month, Governor Branstad said the “timing is right” to pass a gas tax increase this year.

(Radio Iowa)

Iowa’s private colleges complain about new distribution formula for three state universities

News

February 23rd, 2015 by Ric Hanson

The leaders of Iowa’s private colleges and universities say the stability of the state’s higher education “eco-system” is threatened by the proposed “performance-based” funding formula for the three state-supported universities. Mark Putnam, the president of Central College in Pella, says rewarding the state universities with more tax dollars if they enroll more Iowa high school graduates is “perilous” not only for private colleges, but the public universities as well.

“Instability is not a friend to students’ education or research, so changes that occur abruptly can be incredibly disruptive and it creates behavior patterns that are not healthy for institutions,” he says. “So if institutions begin to look at: ‘How can I take students from the others?’ or ‘How can I start to position myself to win?’…then it becomes something that’s not helpful.” Grand View president Kent Henning says even though legislators haven’t approved the plan yet, the University of Iowa is already reacting.

“It’s now financial aid season and we are getting reports of students receiving very generous financial aid packages from the University of Iowa, almost free rides,” he says. “And while that’s wonderful for those students…I think the state’s taxpayers should be wondering and asking: ‘What’s going on? How is that possible?’ if the state universities keep coming back to the legislature pleading poverty.” University of Dubuque president Jeffrey Bullock says it is “ludicrous” for the public universities, especially the University of Iowa, to start adjusting enrollment policy to more strongly favor in-state rather than out-of-state students.

“Right now over 90 percent of the college-going population of this state stays in the state anyway,” Bullock says. “Why would we want to erect a wall…that effectively keeps potential not just students out — higher net paying students, by the way — but also future employees that help grow the economy and fill the gap, the employment gap that we all know exists in this state?” The three private college presidents discussed the issue during a joint appearance on Iowa Public Television’s “Iowa Press” program this past weekend. Gary Steinke, the executive director of the Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, says “every other state” that has tied state tax dollar support to in-state student enrollment has abandoned the effort.

Tennessee was the first to try it in 2009 and it doesn’t work and they don’t do it any more. They have taken the enrollment weighting out of their performance-based funding plan and so so has Indiana and so has Virginia and so has Maine,” Steinke says. “I mean, they don’t use it any more because it doesn’t work.” Steinke says the proposal has sparked a “sector war” in Iowa’s high education community — for an idea that research shows ultimately makes no improvement in student performance.

The Board of Regents — the nine-member panel that governs the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa — has proposed a change in the formula that distributes state tax dollars to the three public universities. Regents officials say it’s designed, in large part, to reward U-N-I which has gotten the smallest share of state support in the past and where over 90 percent of students are Iowa residents. The loser in the change would be the University of Iowa, where nearly half of the students come from out-of-state.

(Radio Iowa)