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Atlantic man arrested on warrant; Stuart man arrested for Domestic Abuse by strangulation

News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The Adair County Sheriff’s Office reports a Cass County man was arrested last week on an Adair County warrant for Violation of Probation. 37-year old Shawn Glen Wolverton, of Atlantic, was arrested Thursday afternoon in Greenfield, and brought to the Adair County Law Enforcement Center and later released on $5,000 bond.

A man from Stuart was arrested Thursday afternoon also, for Domestic Abuse by strangulation. 34-year old Justin Patrick Beaman was arrested by Stuart Police and later released on $2,000 bond.

And three eastern Iowa men were arrested Friday morning by the Iowa State Patrol, in Adair County. The men, 25-year old Christopher Patrick Carr and 23-year old Ramon LaMar March, both of Davenport, and 18-year old Tyler John Guizar, of Buffalo, were in a vehicle that was stopped on I-80 near the Adair Exit. The men were charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance/Marjuana, and later release on $1,000 bond, each.

(9-a.m. News)

WDSM woman arrested Friday in Creston on drug & other warrants

News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Creston Police report a woman from Polk County was arrested Friday afternoon at the Union County Law Enforcement Center on four Union County warrants for Violation of Probation on original charges of: 2nd degree Attempted Burglary; Possession of a Controlled Substance/2nd offense; Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd/subsequent offense, for Driving While Denied or Revoked, and Possession of a Controlled Substance/2nd offense. 38-year old Sara Weis, of West Des Moines, was being held in the Ringgold County Jail on $17,000 bond.

Also on Friday, 10-year old Katrina Gogel, of Creston, was referred to Juvenile Authorities from the Creston Middle School on the charges of Assault with Injury and Criminal Mischief 5th. She was released to the custody of Juvenile Authorities.

Early Sunday morning, Creston Police arrested 26-year old T’Lee Jones, of Creston, on a Union County felony Warrant for the charge of Controlled Substance Violation. She was later released from the Union County Jail on $5000 bond. That same morning 42-year old William Pettit, of Creston, was arrested on an OWI 1st offense charge. He was later released from the Union County Jail on  $1000 bond. And, 25-year old Nathan Vicker, of Creston, was arrested Sunday morning on a charge of Disorderly Conduct. Additional charges of Possession of a Controlled Substance, Interference with Offical Acts and Possession of Contraband in Correctional Institution were added at the Law Enforcement Center/Union County Jail. Vicker was being held in the Union County Jail on $5000 bond.

Authorities said also, a resident of the 300 block of Livingston Avenue, reported Saturday, that on May 10th, someone attempted to break into his home. The incident happened between the hours of 2:30-pm May 10th and 2-am on May 11th. A similar attempt was made May 13th.  Both attempts caused damage to the homes doors that was estimated at $300.

(Podcast) KJAN Morning News & funeral report, 5/16/2016

News, Podcasts

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The area’s top news at 7:06-a.m., w/KJAN News Director Ric Hanson

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ISU Study: Livestock odor control studies make limited progress

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

A review by experts at Iowa State University finds most of the studies on ways to handle the odor and emissions from animal livestock facilities in the state fail to get very far. Dan Andersen in the Department of Agricultural and Bisosystems Engineering says they looked at odor control research projects in three areas. “One from the animal housing itself, two from the way they’re storing or handling their manure. And three, from their land application area,” Andersen says. “So, we were really curious about what people had tried — and what research had been done on that.”

“There’s a lot of things that are studied in the lab, and very few of those actually make it to field testing. Which does make some sense. Certainly we’re more willing to try things that might be a little crazy or hard to implement in the lab,” according to Andersen. He says it is surprising given the concerns about livestock odors in Iowa that more of the lab tests haven’t advanced.

“And some of that is related to costs and some of it is related to what they found in the lab-scale studies. But I still think it is unfortunate that a lot of these options never make it all the way to the field studies,” Andersen says. “The other thing that we saw is that a lot of the research has tended to focus on swine production systems. Which certainly they can be contributors to odor, but other production systems also are pretty key contributors to odors both in this state around the midwest. So, it is a little surprising that so much of the attention has been just on hogs.”

Andersen says one of the other issues they found is the studies cover a variety of issues related to the odor, but few look at a broader picture of what needs to be done. “For instance, often times a study might focus just on ammonia, or just on greenhouse emissions, or just on odor, rather than putting all the pieces together,” Andersen explains. “So I think some of it is just making sure as scientist we are all laying the foundation to say as we evaluate this technology are we thinking about both what we are really trying to focus on today — but sort of that big picture of where the demands for agriculture might go.”

Andersen says moving some of these lab studies forward could be a way to find something that works and is cost effective. “We are at a point where a lot of those things that really make a high impact are still pretty costly to implement. So, I think a lot of the focus needs to be looking at these technologies that have shown promise — things like bio-filters or covered manure storages — and really looking at way to make them cost feasible for farms to implement,” Andersen says.

Andersen and others looked at more than 260 research papers on the effectiveness of technologies intended to control gaseous, odor and particulate emissions from livestock and poultry operations.

(Radio Iowa)

Accident in Red Oak, Sunday

News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Police in Red Oak say no injuries were reported following a collision between a semi and a car, Sunday afternoon. Officials say the accident happened at around 4:30-p.m. at the intersection of Highway 34 and 4th Street, when a semi driven by 34-year old Gurmeet Singh, of Burbank, CA, collided with a 2008 Ford Focus, driven by 63-year old Christine Seeley, of Red Oak.

Seeley stopped at the intersection and then pulled out to turn south onto 4th Street when her car was hit in the rear quarter panel. The impact ripped the rear bumper off the car. The damage was estimated at $6,000. The semi tractor sustained minor damage to its bumper. No citations were issued.

More than 2000 rally in Albia, in support of Welcome Home Soldier memorial

News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The City of Albia nearly doubled in size Sunday for a rally to show support for the “Welcome Home Soldier” Memorial. A Washington, D.C.-based group has threatened to sue, arguing the memorial’s 21 crosses violate the separation of church and state since the display sits on public land. Jim Keller, founder and president of the “Welcome Home Soldier” board, says the families of veterans paid for each the crosses.

“I always told everybody when you come here, I want to tear your heart out and hand it right back to you,” Keller said. “I think that’s how much I appreciate everybody that fought for our country.” Officials estimated a crowd of two-thousand turned out in Albia for the event. Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds told rally-goers the threatened lawsuit is an attack on religious liberty.

“It is up to us to stand up and say: ‘We will not tolerate this infringement on our rights. We will not allow this memorial to be taken down,'” Reynolds said, to cheers. Reynolds says the “elitists” are counting on Iowans to lose their resolve.  “We must stand together in this fight like each and every one of you are doing here today and, collectively, we must say: ‘Enough is enough,'” Reynolds said. Reynolds says if it’s O-K for crosses to mark the graves of soldiers at cemeteries in Normandy and Arlington, it should be O-K in Monroe County, Iowa.

State Senator Ken Rozenboom, of Oskaloosa, represents the area and he says this is a battle between “political correctness” and the free speech rights of Albia families who had the names of loved ones carved in the crosses. Last year, Americans United for Separation of Church and State raised concerns about a veterans memorial in a Knoxville city park that depicted a soldier kneeling next to a cross. Two members of the Knoxville City Council who voted to move that memorial to private land lost their bids for reelection.

(Radio Iowa)

Drones, TPP, Iran nuclear deal among topics at US Senate candidate forum

News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The four Democrats running for the U.S. Senate in Iowa are raising serious concerns about the Obama Administration’s use of drones to target terrorists overseas. The candidates appeared Sunday afternoon at a forum sponsored by the “Stop The Arms Race” PAC. Patty Judge says it’s important to take out “high value” targets, but she says the Pentagon, not the C-I-A, should be running the U.S. drone program.

It’s a military tool and it needs to be treated as a military tool,” Judge says. Rob Hogg  says he has “deep concerns” because our enemies may use drones to strike us. “If we can do things that keep the men and women in our services out of danger by using them for informational purposes, that’s probably a good thing,” Hogg says, “…but we’ve got to be really, really careful.” Tom Fiegen says there are too many civilian casualties with drone strikes.

“You wonder why there are more terrorists? It’s because we use
drones to kill people who are innocent victims,” Fiegen said, to applause. Bob Krause says there is a “joystick mentality” that goes with the operation, but he’s not calling for abandoning the use of drones. “I don’t know that I’m willing yet to say that we need to stop targeting and pinpointing the leadership of ISIS,” Krause says.

The Democratic candidates also agreed the U.S. should NOT use torture when interrogating terror suspects. Regarding two of President Obama’s foreign policy achievements, all four expressed opposition to the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal, but they were united in their support of the president’s nuclear agreement with Iran. Patty Judge says it will help maintain peace in the Middle East.

“However, we must also understand and realize that we have got to be very vigilant,” Judge says. “There needs to be careful monitoring.” Rob Hogg says people overlook that the deal had international support from U.S. allies. “Even Ronald Reagan used nuclear arms negotiations with the ‘Evil Empire’ to bring moderation to the Soviet Union,” Hogg said, “so why shouldn’t President Obama be able to do that with Iran?” Bob Krause says it was “nearly criminal” for Senator Chuck Grassley to sign onto a letter Senate Republicans sent the “Supreme Leader” in Iran.

“It will probably never be prosecuted, but it was clearly wrong,” Krause said, “and it played into the hands of the far right wing in Iran.” Tom Fiegen describes himself as a peace activist who supports the deal with Iran. “I believe it represents a triumph of diplomacy over war,” Fiegen says. Donald Trump was a frequent target during the two-hour-long forum, as was Senator Grassley.

The four candidates are competing to win the June 7th Democratic Primary and the chance to face Grassley in the General Election.

(Radio Iowa)

Iowa early News Headlines: Monday, May 16th 2016

News

May 16th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Here is the latest Iowa news from The Associated Press at 3:40 a.m. CDT

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A voluntary state program that aims to improve water quality practices at farms around Iowa is entering its fourth year amid growing differences about the best ways to clean up the state’s waterways. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced this month the sign-up period is open for its cost-share program that allows farmers to offset the expense of installing some water quality practices. Some agriculture experts say it’s not enough for long-term benefits.

FORT DODGE, Iowa (AP) — In the trucking industry, technology is driving change. Todd Smith, chief operating officer at Decker Truck Line Inc. in Fort Dodge said that by the end of 2017 it will be mandated that all trucks have electronic logs. Paper logs will no longer be accepted. This change in technology has made it a difficult transition for some of the older truckers, who account for a large percentage of drivers. Smith said the average age of the driving force today is an estimated 57 years old.

SOLON, Iowa (AP) — Iowa officials are considering banning alcohol at two state beaches because of past problems, but the rule hasn’t been approved yet. The ban would apply initially at Lake Macbride near Solon and Pleasant Creek at Palo. Alcohol would be banned at the beaches but would be allowed in the campgrounds.

DAVENPORT, Iowa (AP) — Officials in eastern Iowa plan to hold groundbreaking ceremony for new Scott County sheriff’s headquarters. The $4.55 million facility is expected to be completed next spring. The new headquarters will be built in Eldridge, Iowa.

Voluntary water quality program in Iowa highlights issues

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 15th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A voluntary state program that aims to improve water quality practices at farms around Iowa is entering its fourth year amid growing differences about the best ways to clean up the state’s waterways. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship has announced the sign-up period is open for its cost-share program that allows farmers to offset the expense of implementing some water quality practices. The money will be available in July.

The agriculture department says the program is among several water quality initiatives. Some agriculture experts say it’s not enough for long-term benefits. The Iowa Legislature failed this session to figure out a sustainable funding source for water quality initiatives. There is also tension over whether cleanup efforts should include regulation or expanded voluntary efforts like the cost-share program.

Cass County Supervisors to meet Monday

News

May 15th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The Cass County Board of Supervisors will meet Monday morning, in Atlantic. Normally, they meet every Wednesday morning, except during the last week of the month. During Monday’s 8:30-a.m. session at the courthouse, the Board expects to hear a report and funding request from Kenner Baxter, Cass County Tourism Representative. The funding request is with regard to costs associated with a County tourism brochure.

Other, regular reports, if available, may be presented by the Cass County Attorney, Engineer, and Mental Health/Disabilities/General Assistance department heads.