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Another bridge in western IA is closed

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Officials in Shelby County said Thursday, a bridge located in the southern half of the 700 block of Woodland Road is closed for an indefinite period of time following an inspection. The bridge, over an unnamed tributary of Indian Creek, is between Jackson Township, sections 35 and 36. The structure was determined to be unsafe and closed immediately. For emergency crews information: the residence at 719 Woodland Road will only be accessible from the north.

Earlier in the day, Thursday, the Audubon County Emergency Management Agency said the Audubon County Engineer’s office was forced to immediately close a bridge in the 1900 block of 220th Street, following an inspection that determined the bridge was unsafe. The bridge is located just east of Highway 71 on 220th Street (just east of Agriland FS), in Audubon County. The closure will be in effect until plans can be made to make repairs.

shelby-co-bridge

Shelby County Bridge closed location

Audubon County Bridge closed location

Audubon County Bridge closed location

Rollover accident on I-80 east of Shelby

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Rescue crews and law enforcement were on the scene of a rollover accident on Interstate 80 one-mile east of Shelby, Thursday night. The crash was reported just before 7-p.m. It took place on the eastbound interstate. One person was injured. The individual was said to be out of the vehicle suffering from a head injury. According to witness reports, the vehicle blew a front tire between Exits 29 and 34, before it went out of control.

No other details are currently available.

Nebraska, Iowa place in top third in national science test

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska and Iowa have placed in the top third of the country for science proficiency on the 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress science test. The Omaha World-Herald reports that the science test results for fourth, eighth and 12th grade students were released Thursday. The U.S. Department of Education administers the test, which measures knowledge in physical science, life science and earth and space sciences. It also gauges knowledge of science practices.

According to the results, proficiency rates in Nebraska and Iowa public schools exceeded the national average of 37 percent of students scoring proficient or advanced. Peggy Carr, acting commissioner for the National Center for Educational Statistics, says students across the board are improving, but minority students and girls are making gains to narrow achievement gaps.

Halloween Safety Tips

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

BURNSVILLE, MN (October 24, 2016) – As Halloween approaches, AAA – The Auto Club Group reminds parents to be extra careful if their children will be trick-or-treating on neighborhood streets.  Halloween can be a safe and enjoyable time for everyone if motorists are on watch for costumed children who may dart out between parked cars.

“Drivers should be especially careful when pulling in or out of driveways and realize that the normal residential speeds are way too fast when the night is full of excited children moving from house to house” said Amy Stracke, Executive Director, Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation.  “A safe Halloween necessitates seeing others and being seen.”

children-sitting-on-porch-halloween-safety-aaaTo help make this a safer Halloween, AAA offers some reminders:

Motorists:

  • Reduce any distractions inside your car, such as talking on the phone or with other passengers, so you can concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
  • Drive slower through neighborhoods.Driving five miles per hour slower than the posted speed limit will give you extra time to react to children who dart out in front of you.
  • Watch for children walking on roadways, medians and curbs.  In dark costumes, they will be harder to see at night.
  • Turn on your headlights to make yourself more visible – even in the daylight.
  • Drive sober. Nearly 40 percent of fatal crashes on Halloween night involve a drunk driver.
  •  Always designate a sober driver if you plan to drink any alcohol.  Visit www.PreventDUI.AAA.com   to learn more.

Parents:

  • Walk with your children as they go door to door while trick-or-treating. Be sure to show them safe places to cross the street.
  • Ensure an adult or older, responsible youth is available to supervise children under age 12.
  • Buckle up. If driving trick-or-treaters between neighborhoods, always use appropriate car/booster seats and have children exit and enter on the passenger side of the vehicle.
  • Have children carry a glow stick or flashlight to help them see and be seen by drivers.
  • Prevent trips and falls by picking a costume that is the right size and doesn’t block vision.

Trick-or-Treaters:

  • Cross the street and corners using traffic signals and crosswalks.
  • Look both ways between crossing and keep an eye on the road while you are crossing.
  • Always walk facing traffic if there are no sidewalks available and stay as far to the left as possible.
  • Wear light-colored clothing or costumes with reflective material or tape for the best visibility.
  • Consider using nontoxic face paint instead of masks to avoid obstructing vision.
  • Stay in familiar neighborhoods.Only visit homes that have the porch light on and never go into a stranger’s house.
  • Always have an adult check your treats before you eat. Discard anything that looks like it has been unwrapped or altered.

For additional tips to keep Halloween safe, visit http://exchange.aaa.com/safety/child-safety/halloween-safety.

Teen injured in Union County rollover accident, Wednesday

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

A southwest Iowa teen was injured Wednesday afternoon during a rollover accident in Union County. The Sheriff’s Office reports 15-year old Cole Michael Nelson, of Shannon City, was transported by ambulance to the hospital in Creston for treatment of unknown/possible injuries. The crash happened at around 3:45-p.m. Wednesday, on 205th Street.

Officials say Nelson was driving a 2004 Ford pickup westbound when he fell asleep at the wheel. After the truck crossed the center line, Nelson over-corrected, causing the vehicle to go out of control and enter the north ditch, where it rolled once and came to rest on its tires.

The pickup sustained $5,000 damage. No citations were issued.

Inspection results in immediate Audubon County bridge closure

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The Audubon County Emergency Management Agency reports the Audubon County Engineer’s office was forced to immediately close a bridge in the 1900 block of 220th Street, following an inspection that determined the bridge was unsafe. The bridge is located just east of Highway 71 on 220th Street (just east of Agriland FS), in Audubon County.

The closure will be in effect until plans can be made to make repairs. Persons living in the 1900 and 2000 blocks of 220th Street who normally access their properties from the west, will only be able to do so using 215th Street and Lark Avenue from the north and east, or Highway 44 and Kingbird Avenue from the south and east. Addresses in the 2200 and 2300 blocks of Kingbird Avenue will have to be accessed by Highway 44.untitled

Police, Fire and Ambulance services should plan alternate routes for emergency response to nearby residents. If you have any questions, call the Audubon County Engineer’s Office at 712-563-4286.

Japanese ag delegation arrives in Iowa to visit farms, ethanol plants

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

A delegation of Japanese feed buyers will arrive in Iowa this morning (Thursday) for a three-day trade visit to the Hawkeye State. Dennis Friest, of Radcliffe, is a member of the Iowa Corn Promotion Board and the U.S. Grains Council. He says the delegates will visit the DuPont Pioneer headquarters in the Des Moines area and several farming operations.

“They’re going to stop out at my farm for a few hours and make some more visits in southwest Iowa,” Friest says. “We try to work with these buyers to show them what we do and the quality of product that we grow here and keep our markets open, overseas markets.”

Other stops include the Poet ethanol plant in Jewell, the Ag Partners coop in Ellsworth, the Green Plains ethanol production facility in Shenandoah and a farming operation in Randolph. With a population of 127-million, Friest says Japan is an important market for ag products.

“Japan is the second-largest corn market for the United States, importing over 10-million metric tons of corn,” Friest says. “They’re also the 10th largest dry distiller grains market. They’re a huge customer and have been for many years.”

The Japanese delegation represents people involved in corn processing, the feed and corn trade industries as well as a hog and poultry industry journalist. Learn more at: www.iowacorn.org.

(Radio Iowa)

(Podcast) KJAN 8-a.m. News, 10/27/2016

News, Podcasts

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

More area and State news from KJAN News Director Ric Hanson.

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Iowa College Aid says don’t delay in completing FAFSA

News

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Changes now give the parents of prospective and current college students more time to file the information for the  Free Application for Federal Student Aid  or FAFSA. Iowa College Aid spokesperson, Elizabeth Sedrel says “The FAFSA is really the gate toward any financial aid that you might get for college. It’s required for the Pell Grant, for some federal loans and even for about half of the state grants and scholarships that are available in Iowa,” Sedrel says. “So this is your first step. If you are looking to get help paying for college, FAFSA needs to be the first thing you that you do.

The filing window opened at the start of this month and Sedrel says you should get it done as soon as you can. She says if you fill it out now you won’t be rushed to get it done before the holidays, and she says for many colleges the deadline to apply for financial aid is March 1st. In the past you had to wait to file FAFSA until January 1st, and you needed current tax information “Now with the window opening earlier, they are letting you use what they call prior, prior year taxes,” Sedrel says. That means you can use your 2015 tax information to file.

Some students may think their parents make too much money for them to qualify for any aid.  Sedrel says that shouldn’t keep them from filing. “Everyone should file. No one should assume that they are not going to qualify for aid. Something like 85 percent of the people who file find out that they are eligible for some kind of aid to pay for college,” Sedrel says. “And it doesn’t cost anything to file the FAFSA, and for most people it takes under a half hour — so you are really out nothing if you should turn out to be in that very small minority who doesn’t get any aid. But for most people it turns out to be worth it.”

She says go to FAFSA-dot-gov (FAFSA.gov) to file and if you have questions or want some tips,  you can go to the Iowa College Aid website at Iowa-College-Aid-dot-gov (iowacollegeaid.gov).   New and returning college students need to file. Sedrel says you have to file FAFSA for every year in which you hope to get aid to help pay for college.   Sedrel says FAFSA is free just like the name says and you should avoid any websites that want to charge you to file.

(Radio Iowa)

(Podcast) KJAN Morning News & funeral report, 10/27/2016

News, Podcasts

October 27th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The area’s top news at 7:06-a.m., w/KJAN News Director Ric Hanson

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