KJAN Ag/Outdoor

From County extension to conservation to grain prices, we provide lots of information every day on KJAN.  Here is some of that information on the web too!  We hope you find it useful.

DeSoto and Boyer Chute refuges to re-open

Ag/Outdoor, News

December 16th, 2011 by Ric Hanson

Missouri Valley, Iowa (AP) – Federal wildlife reuges that straddle the Missouri River north of Omaha, in Iowa and Nebraska, have been scheduled to re-open to the public next month. The DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges will re-open on January 2nd. Much of the flood damage at DeSoto has been repaired, but the visitor’s center will remain closed for more work. Some hiking trails will not be available.

DeSoto will be closed for the Jan. 11th-Jan. 18th deer hunt, and people will need to use the U.S. Highway 30 entrance to reach the refuge. Visitors to Boyer Chute will have to park at the main entrance gate and enter the refuge on foot. Silt deposited by the floodwaters will prevent driving access to Boyer Chute, indefinitely.

Adair County Beef Weigh-in

Ag/Outdoor

December 15th, 2011 by Stacie Linfor

Adair County 4-H & FFA members who wish to exhibit market beef at the 2012 Adair County Fair or any other 4-H shows must weigh and tag their animals today.  Youth must weigh lead market steers, lead market heifers, feeder pen cattle and return bucket/bottle market animals to be eligible to exhibit at the county fair.  Those who will show only at the county fair should arrive at weigh-in between 9:30 am and 11:30 am.  4-Her’s who will show at the Iowa State Fair or Ak-Sar-Ben and FFA members who will show at the Iowa State Fair should call the extension office now at 641-743-8412 or 1-800-ISUE399 to set up an appointment the weigh between 8:30 am – 9:15 am.

Survey shows economic strength of Midwest & Plains states

Ag/Outdoor, News

December 15th, 2011 by Ric Hanson

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A survey of bankers in 10 Midwest and Great Plains states reflects continued economic growth in the region, which boasts strong agricultural performance and rising commodity prices.The Rural Mainstreet Index rose to 59.7 in December, the highest survey figure since June 2007. The index hit 58.4 in November, 52.9 in October and 52.2 in September. Survey organizers say that whenever the index, which ranges from 1 to 100, is above 50, it suggests the economy will grow.Creighton University economist Ernie Goss, who oversees the survey, says growth in U.S. regions tied to agriculture and energy are outpacing urban areas.The survey covers Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

USDA Report 12-15-2011

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

December 15th, 2011 by Chris Parks

w/ Dave York

Play

ISU survey shows Iowa farmland at record value

Ag/Outdoor, News

December 14th, 2011 by Ric Hanson

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The value of Iowa farmland is up 32.5 percent from last year to a record of over $6,700 an acre. An annual survey by Iowa State University also shows the percentage increase breaks a 38-year-old record of 31 percent set in 1973. The survey released today (Wednesday) shows the average price rose from $5,064 an acre to $6,708 an acre from November 2010 to last month. Before this year the previous high average, adjusted for inflation, had been $5,770 per acre in 1979,

ISU economist Mike Duffy, who conducts the survey, says farmland values have surged along with the surge in commodity prices and farm incomes. O’Brien County in northwest Iowa has the highest average value at $9,513 an acre, up 33 percent.

Cass County Extension Report 12-14-2011

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

December 14th, 2011 by Chris Parks

w/ Kate Olsen discussing popular holiday plants.

Play

KJAN Sales Job Available

Ag/Outdoor, News, Sports, Weather

December 12th, 2011 by Jim Field

Radio Sales Executive

KJAN Radio in Atlantic, IA is looking for a self-motivated, well-organized team player to join our sales staff.  If you enjoy a flexible environment that allows you to meet people, listen to their needs, help them find solutions and make your own paycheck then this job is for you!  Do not apply if you think sales means sitting in the office answering phone calls!

This is a full-time, commissioned sales position with an established territory and room to grow.  KJAN also offers a benefit plan to the successful applicant.  Sales experience is welcomed but we are willing to train the person who best fits this opportunity.

Interested applicants should apply no later than December 31, 2011 by sending a resume and any other applicable information to:
Jim Field
General Manager
KJAN Radio
PO Box 389
Atlantic, IA 50022
712-243-3920
800-283-5526
kjan@metc.net

Page Co. Farmers receive IA. Farm Bureau award

Ag/Outdoor, News

December 9th, 2011 by Ric Hanson

Two farmers from Page County received the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation’s (IFBF) 2011 Young Farmer Achievement Award, Thursday. The award was presented during the organization’s annual meeting in Des Moines, to Justin and Jennifer Dammann. The Dammanns raise cattle, corn, soybeans, alfalfa and rye on their Century Farm near Essex.

In addition, they offer a number of diversified services including a seed business and custom farming, spraying and harvesting and grain hauling. Justin and his father also run a hay business. Justin and Jennifer have both served the Farm Bureau in various capacities at the local and state levels.

For their award, Justin and Jennifer received a plaque, the use of a John Deere tractor for one year/300 hours or a XT Gator and a 90-day NPNI farm Plan Certificate. They will also receive expense-paid trips to the 2012 American Farm Bureau annual convention in Honolulu (to represent Iowa in the National Young Farmer Achievement competition), the GROWMARK annual meeting in Chicago in August and the IFBF Young Farmer conference in February.

The IFBF’s annual contest honors young farmers who show outstanding management ability in their farming operations and involvement in Farm Bureau and community activities. Second place in the contest went to Tom and Jessica Forbes of Monona County.  The Third place recipients were Mark and Stacy Boender of Mahaska County.

IA DNR: Elk killed in Crawford County to be tested for Chronic Wasting Disease

Ag/Outdoor, News, Sports

December 8th, 2011 by Ric Hanson

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources said Thursday Wildlife biologists killed an elk Wednesday in Crawford County, near Charter Oak. Testing is being done on the elk for chronic wasting disease (CWD), brucellosis and tuberculosis. The animal was killed to protect the health and welfare of the state’s deer herd and domestic livestock.

Dale Garner, chief of the DNR’s wildlife bureau, said “We don’t like having to kill the animal, but at this time, the most reliable method of testing for CWD is from the brain stem which involves putting the animal down.”  Garner added that the department tests thousands of brain stems each year from harvested deer for the disease.

The animal was located by local deer hunters who contacted the DNR. Officials say the hunters were very helpful in keeping tabs on the animal while notification was made to the State Veterinarian’s office with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship to make sure the elk was not an escapee from a local owner.

If the results are negative the meat from the animal will be processed and donated to charitable organizations. Garner said their top concern,  “Is for the health of the state’s deer herd and for domestic livestock. Because once chronic wasting disease (CWD) or bovine tuberculosis (TB) is out there, there is no going back.  For the most part, there will be no happy ending to this situation.”

CWD is a neurological disease affecting cervids, primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein, called a prion that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions. Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head.

When an elk sighting report comes in, the DNR works with IDALS to determine status of elk and the best available options. If the elk can be returned to the proper owners, then they are.  If not, they then pose a risk to spreading CWD and/or other diseases and are dispatched.  The elk are tested for CWD and if the tests are negative, the meat is donated to local needy families or a food bank.

Garner says “Having these escapees is more than a minor irritation.  The prion linked to CWD does not go away when the infected animal dies.  It stays active in the soil and contaminated soil can infect other animals. Like CWD, TB is extremely difficult to get rid of and could cost billions of dollars to the livestock industry.”

Garner said Iowa does not have the large land areas typically needed to support an elk herd.  Elk are two to three times the size of an Iowa white tail, averaging between 500 to 700 pounds.

USDA Report 12-08-2011

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

December 8th, 2011 by Chris Parks

w/ Denny Heflin

Play