Atlantic City Council tables action on two issues; Mayor issues “Keep Atlantic Beautiful” proclamation

News

April 5th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

The Atlantic City Council Wednesday tabled two of the items on their agenda for last night’s meeting. That included the first reading of an ordinance which would have added a Chapter to the City Code with regard to bow hunting of antlerless deer within the City limits. The Council wanted more input and information on the ordinance, as drafted, before it’s put back on the table. They also tabled a resolution to amend the City’s Personnel Policy with regard to employee safety, and loss control measures. The amendments would have required City employees to wear seat belts, and it would require the City to: have a designated physician for on the job injuries, and a return to work policy.

City Administrator Doug Harris said the recommendations followed a site visit from Ed Morrison, Loss Control Representative for the Iowa Municipalities Worker’s Compensation Association (IMWCA). The Council tabled action on the policy, because they still had several questions on some of the guidelines and specifications the IMWCA has proposed its member cities adopt in their ordinances. Instead of acting on the resolution, the Council chose instead to refer it to the City’s Personnel and Finance Committee for further review and clarification.

In other business, the Council passed a resolution accepting and approving the acquisition of property located at 400 Hickory Street, 300 Cedar, and 302 1/2 Cedar. The properties have been deemed abandoned and unsafe for human occupation. With the possible exception of one structure, the other structures are likely to be demolished, and the lots sold to the public.
In his report to the Council, City Administrator Doug Harris said the City’s new, $14-million wastewater treatment plant is scheduled to come on line during the early morning hours of Sunday, April 15th.

Harris says once any “bugs” are worked out of the new system and the plant is fully operational, the old wastewater treatment plant will be demolished, most likely around the first of May. Plans to replace the old wastewater treatment plant began in 2006, after it was determined the current, nearly 70-year old facility could not handle a significant storm water run-off, and, because the D-N-R had required the city to build a million-gallon retention basin, or lagoon. The City opted instead, to build a new, more modern plant.

Also during Wednesday night’s meeting, Mayor Dave Jones issued a proclamation designating April 2012 as “Keep Atlantic Beautiful” month. The proclamation encourages every family, business and organization within the community to keep the town litter-free and “more beautiful.” Jones says citizens should “Look for opportunities to pick-up, clean-up, paint-up, fix-up and plant-up, to see what a difference we can make altogether.”