KJAN Ag/Outdoor

Progress in $5M project to make “mega-trail” for bicycles in central Iowa

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 25th, 2018 by Ric Hanson

Two of central Iowa’s most popular bicycle trails are another step closer to being joined into what one backer calls a “mega-trail.” A 15-thousand dollar grant was landed this week that will help extend the High Trestle Trail from Woodward to connect with the Raccoon River Valley Trail in Perry. Mike Wallace, executive director at the , says they’re working with some two-dozen landowners.

“That gap that we’re trying to make the connection on is a nine-mile segment,” Wallace says. “We’re utilizing former railroad right-of-way and road right-of-way and some land parcels that we’ve been able to acquire, all to make that nine-mile connection.”

The Raccoon River Valley Trail runs a total of 89 miles while the High Trestle Trail is 25 miles long — and it links to other trails extending into Des Moines and well beyond. Closing that nine-mile gap is part of a five-million dollar project, Wallace says, and the timeline is still fluid. “We need to raise another $2-million, so when that happens, I can’t really tell you,” Wallace says. “We apply for state grants, federal grants, private grants, foundations, all those types of things. It’s a slow process.”

The High Trestle Trail has won international acclaim, in large part thanks to the 130-foot-tall bridge and its 43 diamond-shapped ribs, which are illuminated by cool blue lights at night. The trail goes through towns like Woodward, Madrid, Slater, Sheldahl and Ankeny. A recent Iowa State University study found each rider spends between six and 20-dollars per visit.

“It’s a real shot in the arm especially to smaller communities,” Wallace says. “All of the sudden, thousands of people are coming to their community, whereas before they’d be driving right through and not stopping at all. It really does make a significant difference for all communities, whether it’s small or large.”

The north loop of the Raccoon River Valley Trail connects 15 communities and four counties in what’s believed to be the longest paved loop trail in the country at 72 miles.

(Radio Iowa)

It’s sunscreen first, then bug spray

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 25th, 2018 by Ric Hanson

One benefit of a cooler spring was a lack of mosquitoes in Iowa, but Deputy State Epidemiologist, Ann Garvey says the rains and warm weather have change that situation. Garvey says that makes it important to wear insect repellent if you are going to be outside. “We are hearing a lot anecdotally about nuisance mosquito activity and if you wear that insect repellent like a DEET product — that would be effective against mosquitoes and against the ticks — which we know are out and about this time of year as well,” Garvey says.

If you are out during the day then you’ll need sunscreen along with the bug repellent. Doctor Garvey says the used of both often leads to a question. “Sometimes people will ask ‘do we put the sunscreen on first or the insect repellent?’ The recommendation is to put the sunscreen on first and the insect repellent over the top,” according to Garvey. “You’ll often have to reapply the sunscreen more often than you will the insect repellent, so it’s important to read the directions and reapply as directed.”

Garvey says mosquitoes can carry disease and if you are in areas with trees or lots of grass, you could also be bitten by ticks and exposed to a disease. “The most common tick associated illness in Iowa is Lyme disease. We have several hundred cases every year. Last year we had about 250 cases so we expect we’ll see a large number of cases again this year,” Garvey says.

Lyme disease is the only worry when it comes to ticks. “The other two most common ticks are the American dog tick, and that can transmit illnesses like Rocky Mountain spotted fever or Tularemia,” Garvey explains, “and the Lone Star tick can transmit Tularemia and Erlichiosis and so while we talk a lot about the deer tick or the black legged tick, there are other types of ticks that can cause other types of illnesses.”

People pay a lot of attention to avoiding getting bitten by a tick or a mosquito, but sometimes forget some common things at the holiday picnic that can also lead to illnesses. Garvey says they see a lot of illnesses created by improper food handling. “So it’s important as we’re grilling and having those picnics and barbecues this weekend that we’re handling our food properly and encourage everybody to cook their meats to the proper temperature — and keep their hot foods hot and their cold foods cold,” Garvey says.

You can find a variety of information on avoiding ticks and mosquitoes and proper food handling on the Iowa Department of Public Health website.

(Radio Iowa)

Posted County Prices 5/25/18

Ag/Outdoor

May 25th, 2018 by Ric Hanson

Cass County: Corn $3.56, Beans $9.42
Adair County: Corn $3.53, Beans $9.45
Adams County: Corn $3.53, Beans $9.41
Audubon County: Corn $3.55, Beans $9.44
East Pottawattamie County: Corn $3.59, Beans $9.42
Guthrie County: Corn $3.58, Beans $9.46
Montgomery County: Corn $3.58, Beans $9.44
Shelby County: Corn $3.59, Beans $9.42

Oats $2.70 (always the same in all counties)

(Information from the USDA’s Farm Service Agency offices)

2nd Annual Youth Fishing Derby at Lake Anita

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 24th, 2018 by Ric Hanson

The Cass County Conservation Board is holding a youth fishing derby at Cold Springs Park on June 9th 2018. The event is open to the first 50 youths age 15 and under to register for the event. Check-in will run from 8:15am to 8:45am with the derby starting at 9:00am and running till 11:00 am. Prizes will be awarded for the most total weight, heaviest single fish, longest single fish and shortest single fish. There will also be a raffle following fishing. The Conservation board with have some live bait for use and a limited number of fishing poles for use as well.

Lunch will be available for purchase after the event provided by the Lewis Improvement Committee. We would like to thank all those that donated items for the event: Weirich Welding for the trophies, Cappel’s Ace Hardware, Scheels, Bass Pro Shops, and Sportsman’s Warehouse for prizes. To register or for further details please contact Micah Lee with the Cass County Conservation Board at 712-769-2372.

USDA Report 5-24-2018

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

May 24th, 2018 by Jim Field

w/Max Dirks.

Play

Cass County Extension Report 5-23-2018

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

May 23rd, 2018 by Jim Field

w/Kate Olson.

Play

Local 24-Hour Rainfall Totals ending at 7:00 am on Wednesday, May 23

Ag/Outdoor, Weather

May 23rd, 2018 by Jim Field

  • KJAN, Atlantic  .21″
  • 7 miles NNE of Atlantic  .08″
  • Massena  .22″
  • Elk Horn  .11″
  • Avoca  .25″
  • Anita  Trace
  • Oakland  .2″
  • Villisca  .05″
  • Corning  .32″
  • Underwood  .13″
  • Carroll  .04″
  • Clarinda  .02″
  • Shenandoah  .12″

Planting moves forward again with more dry weather

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 22nd, 2018 by Ric Hanson

Iowa farmers spent a lot of time pulling planters last week. With at least four days of good planting weather across the state, the U-S-D-A says 86 percent of the corn has now been planted. That compares to 65 percent last week. Lots of beans were planted too — with 58 percent of the expected ten million acres of soybeans now in the ground. That compares to the 33 percent planted last week. Northwest and north-central Iowa did a lot of catching up this past week — with 70 percent of the corn now planted — compared to 25 percent last week. Those areas still have less than one third of their projected soybeans planted.

(Radio Iowa)

Man accused of stealing around 150 pigs from confinement

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 22nd, 2018 by Ric Hanson

FOREST CITY, Iowa (AP) — A 20-year-old man has been accused of stealing around 150 pigs from a confinement near Lake Mills in northern Iowa. Winnebago County Court records say Robert Morales, of Buffalo Center, is charged with theft and burglary. His preliminary hearing is scheduled for June 8. The pigs were reported stolen Nov. 4 from a Christensen Farms operation.

Iowa leaders urge president to resolve trade dispute with China

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 22nd, 2018 by Ric Hanson

Iowa’s governor, the state agriculture secretary and the leaders of 11 state ag groups are sending a letter to President Trump, urging him to resolve the trade dispute with China. Bill Shipley of Nodaway, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, says the trade war caused by the U-S tariffs imposed on Chinese steel and aluminum must be ended — and soon. “They need to get the issues resolved and work hard at it, not just sit around and twiddle their thumbs for a couple of weeks,” Shipley says. “Farming is a time-dependent industry compared to a lot of things. Find your markets. Work on them. Don’t sit around and wait for things to happen. You have to be proactive.”

Shipley says one-third of the state’s five-billion dollar soybean crop is exported to China and Iowa farmers can’t afford to lose that market. “Iowa would be the hardest-hit state with these tariffs going into effect on ag of any state in the nation,” Shipley says. “Our income’s been cut 40 to 50% in the last six years. Can you name any other industry that’s had their income cut that much — and still, we’re out here doing it?” Shipley says it’s taken decades to nurture a trade relationship with the Chinese and he notes, both nations benefit from the partnership. “We worked so hard to build the Chinese market,” Shipley says. “Thirty-five years ago, they didn’t buy any soybeans. Now, 40% of their usage comes from the United States. That’s a huge change. It’s a market we need and they need us. They need soybeans to feed their livestock and feed their people.”

In the letter to the president, the Iowa group says the state’s citizens and economy depend on having a quick resolution to the trade dispute.

(Radio Iowa)