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Monday evening accident in Atlantic

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

A crash between two vehicles Monday evening in Atlantic resulted in two people being sent to the hospital. Atlantic Police report the driver of one of the vehicles, Thomas Sandbothe, of Griswold, and an unidentified passenger in his vehicle were injured, and transported to the Cass County Memorial Hospital.

The accident happened at the intersection of Highway 71 and 14th Street, at around 6:50-p.m. Officials say a vehicle driven by Brandon Cook, of Bridgewater, was eastbound on 14th Street, as Sandbothe was traveling south on Highway 71. Cook told police he thought Sandbothe was going to turn right onto 14th Street, and proceeded into the intersection, where the vehicles collided.

Cook was cited for failure to obey a stop or yield sign. Damage from the crash amounted to $10,650.

CCMH BHU stays open for now

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

A conference room at the Cass County Memorial Hospital was packed this (Tuesday) morning, with onlookers and persons voicing their concerns over the possible closure of the Behavioral Health Unit at CCMH. A special meeting of the CCMH Board of Trustees had been called to discuss the future of the unit, which reportedly cost the hospital nearly one-half million dollars last year, due to un-reimbursed Medicare and Medicaid expenditures. After nearly two-hours, no decision was made on closing the facility. Instead, the board will look into other options, including downsizing costs associated with remodeling of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) to accommodate the BHU.

CCMH Administrator Pat Markham said architects who are working on the current remodeling project, also drew-up a draft for remodeling the ICU to make room for a downsized BHU unit. She says it wouldn’t be an ideal situation, but it would be functional. It would have four beds instead of the current eight. Rough estimates put the cost at $240- to $250,000.

That doesn’t include mechanical and electrical costs. Markham says they didn’t look at having a separate building on the CCMH campus for a Behavioral Health Unit when they came up with the original remodeling plans, because they anticipated losses associated with the unit. The prospect of downsizing the BHU instead of eliminating it entirely, was a bit easier for the board to accept, but they reached a stalemate, when a vote was taken on a motion to reduce the number of beds from eight-to four.

Board Members John Molgaard, Steve Sisler and Leanne Pellet voted against the motion, while members Ned Brown, Phyllis Stakey and Lois Casey voted in favor. The board was short one member due to a vacancy. Pellet said she voted against the motion, because she doesn’t know where the funding would come from to keep the unit functioning.

After the meeting, Cass County Supervisor Chuck Rieken said the reason the CCMH Board of Trustees reached a stalemate, is because they want the hard numbers crunched on how much a remodeling of the ICU would cost, and the possible revenue alternatives that are available, before any decision is made. He says the Board is on the right track, but both the CCMH Board, and the Board of Supervisors need to know the hard numbers before any consideration can be given to funding or not funding the BHU in the future.

One option that was raised to fund the BHU, involved an increase in the hospital’s tax asking, which is currently at 46-percent. Rieken said the county can’t pursue that, and neither can the CCMH Trustees, without sound legal advice.

CCMH Trustee Ned Brown said during the meeting, that if they should eventually increase the tax asking, it would have nothing to do with the current construction project. Instead, it would only be to keep the BHU “alive.”

Three from NE injured in Shelby County crash

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

Four people, two adults and two teens were injured, one of them critically, during an two-vehicle accident Monday afternoon, in Shelby County. Sheriff’s officials say the driver of one of the vehicles, 50-year old Scott Sholtz, and his passengers 16-year old Olivia Sholtz and 17-year old Rhett Sholtz, all from Hampton, NE, were hurt in the crash. All three were transported to Myrtue Medical Center in Harlan. Olivia Sholtz was later transferred by helicopter to Creighton Hospital in Omaha. The driver of the other vehicle, identified as 70-year old Carol Schimerowski, of Earling, was also hurt and treated for her injuries at the hospital in Harlan.

Authorities say Scott Sholtz’ 2008 Saturn was traveling south on Highway 59 at around 3:30-p.m., when a northbound 2007 Ford Taurus driven by Schimerowski, attempted to turn left onto Highway 37. The resulting collision totaled both vehicles.

The accident remains under investigation.

9AM Newscast 08-23-2011

News, Podcasts

August 23rd, 2011 by admin

w/ Jim Field

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7AM Newscast 08-23-2011

News, Podcasts

August 23rd, 2011 by admin

w/ Ric Hanson

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Tuesday morning accident

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

No injuries were reported, following a two-vehicle accident early this (Tuesday) morning, near Morton Mills, in Montgomery County. Sheriff’s officials say a car driven by Janie S. Voss, of Villisca, and a semi driven by Timothy A. Bunda, of Emmetsburg, collided near the intersection of Highway 71 and 155th Street, at around 4:55-a.m. 

Voss was traveling north on Highway 71 when her Chevy Cavalier was rear-ended by the semi, which was registered to Tim Bunda Trucking. The collision caused a total of $2,850 in damage. 

Charges are pending the completion of an investigation into the crash.

Two teens arrested in connection with Bluffs stadium fire

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

Authorities in Council Bluffs say two teens were arrested Sunday, in connection with the August 14th fire in an office trailer near the Pirate Cover Water Park. The early morning blaze spread to a nearby storage shed and destroyed several pieces of equipment valued at more than $100,000. Both buildings are owned by the Council Bluffs Community School District.

According to Council Bluffs Police Detective Jon Clark, a 14-year old boy was arrested Sunday and released to the custody of his parents. A 17-year old was also taken into custody, and was being held Monday at the Southwest Iowa Juvenile Detention Center. The teens’ names were not released. They’ve been charged with suspicion of second-degree arson and conspiracy.

Detective Clark says both teens have admitted to their involvement in the case, but he declined to elaborate on how the fire started.

Trial tests new non-surgical heart valve replacement

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

A trial is underway at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines on a heart valve replacement procedure that does not require opening up the patient’s chest. Cardiologist, Atul Chawla, says they are doing the procedure on patients with severe aortic stenosis, or failure of the aortic valve.

Chawla says a metallic cage that has pig tissue made into a valve on it is mounted on a catheter and the catheter is sent through a leg artery into the heart. Dr. Chawla says the new cage valve is then installed right into the diseased valve.

He says they go in with a balloon and dilate the old valve and then place the cage, which is self-expanding, and it opens up and pushes the old valve out of the way. Chawla says they are looking for up to 18-hundred patients who are interested in taking part in the trial.

Chawla says the trial is comparing this procedure with the standard procedure to see if it is the equivalent without having to open up the chest. The second part of the trial is examining whether this non-surgical procedure is better for patients who cannot have the one-heart operations. Chawla says the first couple of procedures have had great results.

He says the patients were discharged much earlier and much healthier than those who undergo the surgical procedure because there is not recovery from the surgery. Chawla says his first patient was sitting up and talking and having dinner three hours after the procedure. Chawla says they kept the first patient’s in the hospital for three days as a precaution, but someone could normally go home 48 hours after this procedure. The trial will continue into early spring or summer of next year, and then the F-D-A will evaluate the procedure and determine if it can be used.

Chawla says it usually takes the F-D-A six months to one year to analyze the data from a trial, as they like to have at least one year of follow up data. An F-D-A panel would then approve the procedure. The approval is usually given first for patients who can’t undergo the open-heart operation, and then later approved for all patients. Chawla says another non-surgical procedure that uses a totally different type of valve recently won F-D-A approval and should be available at the end of this year. The valve Chawla uses is called the Medtronic CoreValve, and you can find out more about participating in the trial at: www.aorticstenosistrial.com or by calling 515-802-4057.

(Radio Iowa)

Hospital uses plane for quick transport

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

While many hospitals use helicopters to bring patients in quickly, a hospital in the Council Bluffs area is switching to an airplane for certain circumstances. Dr. Rob Chaplin is medical director of the children’s transport service at Children’s Hospital and Medical Center in Omaha. He says the twin-engine King Air 100 airplane extends their ability to reach ill children and transport them to the hospital.

“With the helicopter, the range is about 150 miles, on average, and with the new aircraft, our range will be about a thousand miles,” Dr. Chaplin says. The transport service will now cover all of Nebraska, central and western Iowa and parts of South Dakota, Minnesota, Missouri and Kansas.

“We are expecting to be busy,” Chaplin says. “This is a service that no one else provides in this part of the country, especially for pediatrics. The closest being probably Children’s Mercy in Kansas City and then Denver Children’s out in Denver.” He says more physicians are seeing the advantage of having a dedicated pediatric team that can now take to the air to transport very ill children to the specialists in Omaha.

“It is equipped with the same equipment that we would carry on the ground or in the helicopter,” Chaplin says. “We have all of the medical equipment that we bring along. We have the ability to perform any of the procedures that we could essentially anywhere else in the state we can now do in the aircraft as well.” The Critical Care Transport’s first flight was to Kearney, Nebraska, last week.

(Radio Iowa)

CCMH Board of Trustees to discuss Behavioral Health Unit today

News

August 23rd, 2011 by Ric Hanson

The Cass County Memorial Hospital Board of Trustees will hold a special public meeting this morning at 8 o’clock in Atlantic, to decide the future of the Behavioral Health Unit at CCMH. The meeting was to have been held last week, but CCMH Administrator Pat Markham said one of the board members was not available for that meeting.

The board has held previous discussions on the possible closure of the BHU, because they say, the facility has been losing revenue. In 2010, the unit cost the hospital $500,000.

The Cass County Board of Supervisors and Sheriff Darby McLaren have sent letters to the board, offering their support for the Behavioral Health Unit, in hopes it will stay in Atlantic. At stake, are 21 jobs, and added costs to the County if BHU patients who are wards of the county, have to be transferred to other facilities across the state.

Today’s meeting will take place in CCMH Conference Room number One, first floor meeting room.