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NWS Forecast for Cass & area Counties in Iowa: 1/14/13

Weather

January 14th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

(INCLUDING THE CITY OF ATLANTIC) 333 AM CST MON JAN 14 2013

TODAY…PARTLY SUNNY. HIGH IN THE MID 20S. WEST WIND NEAR 10 MPH.

TONIGHT…PARTLY CLOUDY. LOW 10 TO 15. SOUTHWEST WIND NEAR 5 MPH.

TUESDAY…PARTLY SUNNY. HIGH IN THE LOWER 30S. SOUTHWEST WIND 5 TO 15 MPH.

TUESDAY NIGHT…PARTLY CLOUDY. LOW IN THE LOWER 20S. SOUTHWEST WIND 5 TO 15 MPH WITH GUSTS TO AROUND 25 MPH.

WEDNESDAY…PARTLY SUNNY. WARMER. HIGH IN THE MID 40S. WEST WIND 10 TO 15 MPH.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT THROUGH THURSDAY NIGHT…PARTLY CLOUDY. LOW IN THE LOWER 20S. HIGH IN THE UPPER 30S.

FRIDAY AND FRIDAY NIGHT…PARTLY CLOUDY. HIGH IN THE MID 40S. LOW IN THE LOWER 20S.

Forecast 1-12-2013

Weather

January 12th, 2013 by admin

w/Wesley Rondinelli

NWS Forecast for Atlantic & the KJAN listening area: Sat., Jan. 12th, 2013

Weather

January 12th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

Today: Partly sunny, with a high near 23. Wind chill values as low as 5. Windy, with a west northwest wind 16 to 22 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph.
Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 10. Wind chill values as low as -5. Blustery, with a northwest wind 11 to 16 mph, with gusts as high as 23 mph.

Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 19. Wind chill values as low as -5. West northwest wind 8 to 14 mph.
Sunday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 11. West wind 3 to 7 mph.

Monday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 27. West southwest wind 3 to 8 mph.
Monday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 15.

Tuesday: Sunny, with a high near 34.

USDA final report details crop losses to drought

Ag/Outdoor, News, Weather

January 11th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released its final crop report for 2012, showing heavy losses due to the drought still gripping much of the nation.  The year-end report shows farmers got less than three-fourths of the corn the agency initially expected when planting was done in the spring.  The report released Friday shows a harvest of 10.78 billion bushels of corn, 27 percent less than the 14.8 billion bushels anticipated before drought set in.

The number in the final report is slightly more than the agency’s December estimate of 10.72 billion bushels and still marks one of the largest corn harvests in U.S. history. Farmers say better crop technology saved them from more devastating losses, and production was helped by the large number of acres planted this year.

(Podcast) Skyscan Forecast: Fri., Jan. 11, 2013

Podcasts, Weather

January 11th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The (podcast) Freese-Notis forecast for Atlantic & the KJAN listening area, and weather data for Atlantic….

(Podcast) Skyscan Forecast: Thu., Jan. 10th 2013

Podcasts, Weather

January 10th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The (podcast) Freese-Notis forecast for Atlantic, and the KJAN listening area, and weather data for Atlantic….

(Podcast) Skyscan Forecast: 1-9-13

Podcasts, Weather

January 9th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The (podcast) Freese-Notis forecast for the KJAN listening area and weather data for Atlantic…

2012 was 3rd hottest, 19th driest in Iowa history

Ag/Outdoor, News, Weather

January 9th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

State Climatologist Harry Hillaker is reporting 2012 was Iowa’s third hottest year on record. The statewide average temperature through the year was 51.9 degrees. That was 3.8 degrees above normal, but just over one-degree cooler than 1931, the hottest year ever in Iowa. Nationally, government meteorologists say 2012 was the hottest year on record in the United States with an average temperature of just over 55 degrees. In addition to the heat, Iowa and nearly two-thirds of the country endured a summer-long drought.

Hillaker says 2012 was Iowa’s 19th driest year in 140 years of record keeping.  The statewide average precipitation last year was 26.31 inches, nearly 9 inches below normal. The record for Iowa’s driest year was set in 1910 at 19.98 inches of precipitation. Farmers and others who desperately needed rain last summer may find it hard to believe 2012 was only the 19th driest in state history. But, Hillaker notes above normal precipitation was recorded statewide in the months of February, April, October and December. July, meanwhile, was extremely dry and hot.

Hillaker says it the 5th driest July in Iowa history (1st-1936) and the month trailed only 1936 and 1901 for the hottest July in state history. The month of March was the warmest ever, 51.1 degrees on average, besting the previous record set in March 1910 by nearly two-and-a-half degrees. There was yet another unusual weather statistic in Iowa in 2012. You might call it a silver lining of the drought – as there were very few tornadoes.

Hillaker says there were only 16 confirmed tornadoes in Iowa last year and they all happened before the end of May. “Which is pretty amazing considering June is usually our busiest tornado month of the year,” Hillaker said. “That 16 annual total for tornadoes is, at least, our lowest since 1963.” Iowa averages 47 tornadoes per year. A record 120 tornadoes touched down in Iowa is 2004.

(Radio Iowa)

It’s winter, sure, but all of Iowa is still in a drought

Ag/Outdoor, News, Weather

January 8th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

A new federal report finds well over half the country is still in a drought, including all of Iowa and several neighboring states. U-S-D-A meteorologist Brad Rippey says it’s easy to forget about the drought during wintertime, because there’s no blazing heat and lots of snow, but he affirms, the exceptionally dry weather is continuing.  “We still have 61.09% of the contiguous U.S. in drought,” Rippey says. “That is down nearly three-quarters of a percentage point from December 25th but it does still leave, obviously, a significant portion of the country in drought.” That’s virtually unchanged since July when about 60-percent of the nation was in drought conditions. Rippey says we need to be prepared for the long-haul.

Rippey says, “It is not unusual, especially across the western half of the country, for droughts historically to last many years, in the vicinity of a decade.” The famed Dust Bowl drought started in 1931 and lasted until 1940. Rippey isn’t predicting this drought will continue that long, but he reminds, it can happen. While we’ve all heard of a flash flood, Rippey says the “flash drought” isn’t nearly as well known, although Iowa saw a couple of them this past summer. “It is a very fast-developing phenomenon where you have high temperatures and little-to-no rainfall for a short period of time, on the order of one to two to three weeks,” Rippey says. “That’s the situation we’ve seen many times in the last couple of decades where crops get into trouble very quickly.”

While the report finds a large portion of the country is in drought, that includes all of the following states: Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Oklahoma and South Dakota. While parts of Iowa have seen a foot of snow or more already this winter, the report says to overcome the drought, it may take up to eight-feet of snow.

(Radio Iowa)

(Podcast) Skyscan Forecast: Tue., Jan. 8th 2013

Podcasts, Weather

January 8th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The (podcast) KJAN listening area forecast from Freese-Notis, and weather data for Atlantic from KJAN News Director Ric Hanson….