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Arrest warrants issued for 2 men charged in Pott. County assault

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Authorities in Pottawattamie County say they are looking for two men who are wanted on kidnapping charges. The Pott. County Sheriff’s Office says 29-year old Tabitha Proplesch, of Council Bluffs, was found inside her pickup truck near the Crescent exit on I-29. Sheriff Jeff Danker says when deputies found her, she was restrained by handcuffs and severely beaten.  

Troopers from the Iowa State Patrol and deputies from the Pottawattamie County Sheriff’s Department found Proplesch around 2:30pm Thursday. She was transported to a local hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries. Through the investigation with the Department of Criminal Investigation, 38 year old Brian Bey of Crescent and 32 year old Travis Labno of Omaha have been charged with 1st degree kidnapping.

Danker said he believes Proplesch knew the two men and this was not a random act. A warrant is out for the arrest and whereabouts of Bey and Labno as they are believed to be armed and dangerous. If you have any information regarding the mens’ location, contact the Pottawattamie County Communications Center at 712-328-5737, the Pottawattamie County Sheriff’s Office at 712-890-2200 or dial 9-1-1.

Cass Co. Board to act on 28-E agreement for Mental Health Svcs.

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

The Cass County Board of Supervisors, next week, are expected to take action on signing a letter of intent to join with other counties in a 28-E agreement for Mental Health services, as regionalization is required. The move will come during their regular meeting at 9-a.m., Wednesday.   Governor Terry Branstad signed legislation last week in Waterloo, that reform’s the state’s mental health system. It shakes up the current county-based format in favor of one based on “regions.”Cass County Mental Health Coordinator Teresa Kanning told the Board during their meeting Thursday (May 31st), that the Department of Human Services will not dictate to the various County Boards of Supervisors how to set-up the 28-E agreements, but there will be “boiler plate” documents (templates) available, on how those Boards may wish to proceed. 

Kanning says during a recent meeting she attended, the topic of “Transition Funding” was discussed, as it pertains to the new mandate. She said there is a source of $20-million to put into the transition process which has been identified for the counties. Those counties needing funds to aid in the transition for the coming Fiscal year, which begins July 1st, need to have their paperwork in order and apply for that money by October. When the new legislative session begins in January, the money is supposed to be in-place, ready to be dispersed. The funds are available to those counties which do not have enough money from property taxes to help pay for the costs of transition. Kanning says right now, she doesn’t think Cass County will qualify for any of those funds, unless something happens that would change that situation.

Supporters of the bill say it equalizes the quality of mental health care across Iowa. One change: the state will pick up the county’s share of Medicaid costs. Some county officials in Iowa say that in order to pay for Medicaid though, the state will take back a large chunk of their funding. That’s funding work programs for the intellectually disabled depend on.

Cass Co. Health System Open House set for June 10th

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

An official with the Cass County Memorial Hospital says the Cass County Health System will host a community open house Sunday, June 10th, from 1 – 5 pm, in Atlantic.  The open house will showcase the completion of Phase 1 of the CCHS Addition and Renovation Project.  Guests should enter via the the main north entrance. CCMH CEO Pat Markham says they are excited to share the progress that’s been made since ground was broken 14-months ago on the new addition to the hospital. Markham says “The improvements in facilities and equipment are amazing,” and will enable them to continue providing outstanding care for their patients.

The main emphasis of Phase 1 is a two-story 42,250 sq. ft. addition, mostly to the southeast of the existing hospital.  The main floor of the new area includes the Emergency Department and Admissions, Same Day Surgery and Surgery Department.  All of the areas have been designed to maximize patient privacy and security, while accommodating the latest in medical technology.  The second floor of the addition houses Inpatient Services, which includes Obstetrics, Medical/Surgical, and Intensive Care Units.  Another major improvement in the new addition will be the updated air-handling systems which will allow more comfortable, consistent temperatures in patient rooms.

Work was also done at Atlantic Medical Center during Phase 1, with the expansion of Suite C to create a separate Obstetrics/Gynecology area, and the remodeling of some existing space to create Suite D with six additional family medicine exam rooms.  And, the CCMH atrium area has been redecorated, thanks to a $140,000 donation from the CCMH Auxiliary.  The Auxiliary funds were also used to purchase new flat-screen televisions for patient rooms and waiting areas in the new addition.

The Atlantic Medical Center addition and remodeling was completed last fall, and have been in use since that time.  The hospital areas will move into the new addition shortly after the open house; the main floor departments will move the weekend of June 15, with the second floor departments moving the weekend of June 29.  Immediately following the move, work will begin on Phase 2 of the Addition and Renovation Project. That includes the remodeling of an existing 22,000 sq. ft., primarily for improved outpatient services.

Trottin for Taylor – Trip to raise awareness of Batten Disease

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

A Monona County resident is hitting the road on a trip across the state of Iowa for her grandson. Tammy Mohr, of Ute, is beginning her trip across Iowa called, “Trottin’ for Taylor” to raise awareness and funding for Batten Disease. 

Mohr’s grandson Taylor Lee Mohr has Batten Disease, a rare neurological degenerative disease that comes in four forms and is fatal in every case. The form Taylor has the late infantile form of the disease and there is no cure. Taylor is eight years old and is bedridden, blind, can not walk or talk, and his limbs are contracted. The condition forces him to use a feeding tube. 

The trip by his grandmother Tammy will begin in Muscatine on Saturday, and will end in Missouri Valley on Monday, June 18th at the Missouri River. The entire trip from one end of Iowa to the other will be done horse back riding. Tammy welcomes others to join her at any point on her ride. 

She plans to stay overnight in several places including stops in Massena, Atlantic, Avoca and Beebeetown. Donations can be made to Tammy Mohr 42883 270th Street, Ute, IA 51060. Any donations made will be delivered to the University of Iowa Batten Research. You can follow Tammy’s journey on Facebook by searching for “trottinfortaylor”.

Survey: economy slows in 9 Midwest, Plains states

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – A new monthly report suggests economic growth is slowing in nine Midwest and Plains states, but the region remains healthy overall. Creighton University economist Ernie Goss says businesses in the region are still benefiting from healthy farm income and exports. But he says the strong dollar is limiting the amount of growth.
 
The report’s overall economic index declined to 57.6 in May from April’s 60, but remained well above the neutral score of 50.  The survey uses a collection of indexes ranging from zero to 100. Any score above 50 suggests growth while a score below 50 suggests decline for that factor.   The survey of business leaders and supply managers covers Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma and South Dakota.

8AM Newscast 06-01-2012

News, Podcasts

June 1st, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Ric Hanson

Play

7AM Newscast 06-01-2012

News, Podcasts

June 1st, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Ric Hanson

Play

SW IA opera house, built in 1902, to hold first big event since restoration

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

One of the few remaining historic opera houses in Iowa will hold its first big event tonight (Friday) following the facility’s grand reopening in early April. De (dee) Heaton is the program director at the Corning Opera House in southwest Iowa. The structure was built in 1902.

Corning Opera House BEFORE restoration

“We completely restored from the roof to the basement,” Heaton says. “The auditorium is restored to look like the original and we added a conference room and a prep kitchen for catering.” Between 1870 and 1920, roughly 1,500 opera houses were built in Iowa. In recent years, several Iowa cities have taken steps to restore the structures.

Heaton says many opera houses are still standing, but have been abandoned. Some of Iowa’s recently restored opera houses are located in Elkader, Coggon, Clermont, Decorah, DeWitt, What Cheer and Dubuque. The Corning Opera House, which has room for about 300 people, will be used for concerts and movies and can be rented for wedding receptions and other special events. Tonight, the Corning Opera House will host a special screening of “The Last Ride” – a new movie about the life of 1940s and 50s country music star Hank Williams. “There are 10 historic theaters across the United States that get to premiere the movie and we are the only one in the Midwest,” Heaton says.

Corning Opera House AFTER restoration

 The movie will show today, Saturday and Sunday at 7 p.m. each evening. Tickets are $8 for adults and $6 for students at the door.

National Weather Service to begin issuing cell phone severe weather alerts

News, Weather

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Officials with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have announced the agency is providing additional tools for federal, state, local officials and others, to alert and warn the public about severe weather. The Commercial Mobile Alert System, or CMAS, will be used to deliver Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) to wireless carriers for distribution to the public. That means your cell phone will receive messages on its screen, similar to a text message, showing the type and time of the alert, along with what type of action will be taken. The alerts will NOT take the place of locations where CODE RED alert systems are in-place, as those systems also handle a wide variety of local emergency situations. 

The message will be no more than 90 characters, and will have a unique tone and vibration, indicating a WEA has been received. If an alert is received by your cell phone, you are advised to follow the instructions and seek additional information from local radio, television, NOAA Weather Radio and other official sources for emergency information. 

The alerts will be broadcast by cell towers. Any cell phone within range of those specific towers will immediately pick up the signal, provided they are capable of receiving the alerts. The availability of WEA alerts will be dependent on the network status of the wireless carriers and handset availability, since not all cell phones receive WEA’s. Check with your cellular carrier to see if WEA alerts are available in your area. 

FEMA says as with all new cellular services, it will take time for upgrades in infrastructure, coverage and handset technology, to allow WEA alerts to reach all cellular customers.

Atlantic receives over $510,000 for airport design standards

News

June 1st, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Iowa Senator Tom Harkin has announced the City of Atlantic’s airport has received a grant amounting to $510,763 to assist the facility in meeting design standards. The funds were a portion of the more than $11.5-million awarded to 27 Municipal airports in Iowa, from the US Dept. of Transportation and F-A-A. 

Also receiving grant monies were these airports; Arthur N. New in Carroll, $236,700 – for the acquisition of replacement snow removal equipment; Creston Municipal Airport, $412, 408 – to enhance airport access; Guthrie County Regional Airport, $382,500 – for construction of a hangar building; Red Oak Municipal Airport, $142,106 – for the replacement of snow removal equipment; and Schneck Field in Clarinda, $313, 920 – for the rehabilitation of the runway lighting system. 

Senator Harkin, who is a member of the appropriations subcommittee which funds the DOT, said the funds will ensure Iowa’s municipal airports have the resources they need to update, repair or replace their facilities.