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Housing rehab grants available for Elk Horn residents

News

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Officials with the Southwest Iowa Planning Council (SWIPCO), report SWIPCO is seeking two more applicants for a housing rehabilitation program in the City of Elk Horn. Up to $24,999 in home repairs per home, with additional money for lead abatement, is available for the five year forgivable loan.

Applicants must live in the target area, be income qualified, be the homeowner of record, and live in the residence. SWIPCO staff is available to help all homeowners through the application, income qualification, and rehabilitation process.SWIPCO

Community Development Director Amber Carcel says “This program allows us (SWIPCO) to do so much for homeowners. With the large amount of funds available per home we can help repair a leaking roof, replace windows, put on new siding, or whatever the most pressing need is for that particular home.”

The funds are made possible by a Community Development Block Grant the City of Elk Horn received from the Iowa Economic Development Authority in 2015. Elk Horn was awarded $304,000 for the repair of eight homes. Six homes have been approved and are in the rehabilitation process.

Interested applicants should contact SWIPCO at 712-243-4196 for more information.

(Podcast) KJAN 8-a.m. News, 7/29/2016

News, Podcasts

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

More area and State news from KJAN News Director Ric Hanson.

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Western Iowa woman accused of injuring little boy

News

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) – An Avoca woman has been accused of injuring a little boy. The Daily Nonpareil reports 23-year-old Tanisha Pallaya has been charged with felony child endangerment causing injury. Her attorney, Bill McGinn, said Friday that Pallaya would be pleading not guilty.

A court record says the child, who was born in 2012, was taken to an Omaha hospital in May. Doctors say the child’s bruises and abrasions on his back, abdomen, head, arms and elsewhere on his body appeared to have been caused by blunt force and didn’t appear To have been the results of an accident or accidents. Pallaya’s next court date is set for Aug. 5th.

Dayton Rodeo founder died in fire, authorities say

Ag/Outdoor, News, Sports

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

DAYTON, Iowa (AP) – Authorities say one of the founders of the Dayton Rodeo has died during a fire at his Dayton home. The Webster County medical examiner pronounced 98-year-old Allen Porter dead at the scene Thursday. Dr. Dan Cole told The Messenger that Porter’s body was found in a hallway. An autopsy has been ordered.  Fire officials say Porter’s caretaker escaped through a window. The fire cause is being investigated.

A Dayton Wranglers Saddle Club account of the rodeo’s history says Porter helped started the event in 1937 with Duane Vegors and Vern Danielson. They began with rope trucks in the city park. Porter will be honored during an empty saddle ceremony at the rodeo. It’s scheduled for Sept. 5 at 1:30 p.m.

(Podcast) KJAN Morning News & funeral report, 7/29/2016

News, Podcasts

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The area’s top news at 7:06-a.m., w/KJAN News Director Ric Hanson

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Authorities say chemical that rained down was fungicide

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

MARION, Iowa (AP) – Authorities say the chemical that rained down on a northeast Marion neighborhood was a fungicide. Several people called 911 Tuesday night after noticing a white substance on vehicles and houses. The Marion Fire Department said in a news release Thursday that tests show the substance has components commonly found in a field treatment used by farmers.

Iowa public health officials say that after 12 hours, lawns or vegetation exposed to the fungicide weren’t expected to pose health risks to people. Officials say exposed hard surfaces should be cleaned with soapy water, and all clothes and bare skin that were covered by the substance should be washed. The incident is still being investigated.

3 arrests in Red Oak, Thursday

News

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Red Oak Police report three arrests took place, Thursday. At around 11:35-p.m., officers with the Red Oak P-D arrested 52-year old Robert Wade Abraham, of Red Oak, for Interference with Official Acts. Abraham was being held in the Montgomery County Jail on a $300 cash bond.

And, at around 3:45-p.m., Red Oak Police arrested 20-year old Ridge Allen Casteel, of Creston, and 20-year old Ashley Kate Lewis, of Red Oak. Casteel was charged with Assault and Trespass, while Lewis faces a Domestic Abuse Assault, charge. Both were transported to the Montgomery County Jail, where Casteel was being held on $300 bond, and Lewis was being held without bond until appearing before a magistrate.

National Balloon Classic set to lift off in Indianola

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Dozens of hot air balloons will be flying over south-central Iowa over the next 9 days and nights. Indianola has hosted the National Balloon Classic, billed as “one of the largest and longest hot air balloon events in the Midwest,” for over 40 years. Jim Fromm, who serves on the National Balloon Classic board, says spectators will watch nearly 100 balloons decorate the sky.

“We had 86 registered pilots, so around 90 or so balloons will be here,” Fromm said.Natl Balloon Classic This year’s event launches tonight (Friday) and runs through August 6. There are evening flights combined with live music each night beginning at 6 p.m. The morning launches are scheduled each day at 6:30 a.m., but balloons will also fill the sky even earlier in the morning on both Saturdays and next Wednesday morning.

“There’s ‘Dawn Patrol,’ which is an unusual happening with balloons. Typically, we don’t fly with any aircraft lights on, but for (dawn patrol) we do hang lights on…and launch before sunrise, in the dark,” Fromm said. “We launch and fly for an hour or two, until the sun comes up. Everytime we hit the burner, the whole balloon lights up and that is very impressive.”

Similarly, “Nite Glow” events are scheduled after sunset this Sunday, next Wednesday (8/3), and next Friday (8/5). Learn more at: nationalballoonclassic.com.

(Radio Iowa)

Iowa early News Headlines: Friday, 7/29/2016

News

July 29th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Here is the latest Iowa news from The Associated Press at 3:40 a.m. CDT

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A review of Des Moines Police Department data shows the city has seen an increase in drive-by shootings this year. The Des Moines Register reports that 31 drive-by shootings were reported in the city through the end of June. Police say 22 drive-by shootings were reported during the same time period last year. Sixteen drive-by shootings were reported for the same period in 2014, and 22 were reported the year before. Des Moines police Sgt. Paul Parizek says there isn’t one cause for the shootings.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A judge has rejected conspiracy allegations against Missouri State Highway Patrol commanders named in a federal civil lawsuit over the 2014 drowning of a 20-year-old handcuffed Iowa man at Lake of the Ozarks. U.S. District Judge Nanette K. Laughrey said Wednesday lawyers for Brandon Ellingson’s family hadn’t proved that patrol officials conspired to cover up the cause of the death of Brandon Ellingson, who drowned after he fell from a patrol boat.

FORT DODGE, Iowa (AP) — A 21-year-old Iowa woman who caused a Christmas Day crash that killed a 6-year-old Webster City girl has pleaded guilty to three traffic violations. The Fort Dodge Messenger says Ruth Tomlinson pleaded guilty Wednesday to driving on the wrong side of a highway, failure to maintain control and having no proof of insurance. She was ordered to pay more than $2,300 in fines and court costs.

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is suing federal regulators for approving permits for a $3.8 billion pipeline between North Dakota and Illinois that would be the biggest-capacity pipeline carrying oil out of the state’s oil patch. Tribal officials filed the lawsuit Wednesday against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The tribe says it opposes the Dakota Access Pipeline because it fears a spill could contaminate drinking water on its reservation, which is home to 8,000 people.

Rules updated for those who produce their own electricity

News

July 28th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The Iowa Utilities Board recently updated its rules for people who produce their own electricity. I-U-B spokesman Don Tormey says it involves a process known as “net metering.”  “When customers generate their own electricity, any electricity that the customer generates that they do not use is exported to the utility grid. And under net metering, the customer’s extra generation is credited to his or her account and is used to offset the customer’s future electricity use,” Tormey explains. The new rules expand the size of operations that can feed electricity back into the grid.

He says it now allows larger facilities to participate as they increased it from 500 kilowatts to one megawatt. The rules cover the state’s two largest utility companies and it asks them to write new rules for the cost or tariff charged to the customer for hooking up to the grid. He says the board ordered MidAmerican and Alliant Energy’s subsidiary Iowa Power and Light to file new tariffs on or before August 15th, and once the board receive those, they will have to review and approve them. Tormey says there’s not an exact number of people who are creating their own energy with the chance to feed the excess back to the power companies, but it could be around 15-hundred or more.

“There’s even customers who are off the grid that attempt to do that,” Tormey says. “You know people who live in real remote areas that have attempted to do solar panels and storage batteries and things like that.” He expects more people to look at creating their own energy either from wind or solar.

“It would be a mixture of both, but I would anticipate it might be more solar,” Tormey says. Experts in the field says the cost of solar panels has been coming down as technology improves and more people are looking at using them. You can find out more about net metering on the I-U-B’s website or in the link in this story at iub.iowa.gov

(Radio Iowa)