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Atlantic School Board receives Capital Projects report

News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The Atlantic Community School District’s Board of Education held a work session Monday evening at the High School, during which there was discussion on a couple of matters, but no action was taken. Atlantic Superintendent Dr. Michael Amstein said Design Alliance Architect’s Jerry Purdy presented the Board with five different concepts for the remodeling and/or expansion of the district’s facilities, based on input from teachers, staff and the public.

Amstein said Dena Goplerud also spoke to the about what she could do as far as providing facilitator services to district for further meetings with the public and others with regard to the expansion and/or remodeling options.

The Board tabled a Technology Update from District Technology Coordinator Roger Warne until their next meeting in November, due to Warne having a family emergency. They did however, hear a presentation from the Model Employment Team (MET) who reported on a grant the district received from the State of Iowa. He says Atlantic was one of just four such districts in the State to receive the grant. The grant focuses on employment skills for Special Needs students within the community. The presenters spoke about the possibility of expanding the program this year into the following school year.

And, Dr. Amstein said their certified enrollment this year shows 1,431 students, which he says doesn’t reflect students who are open-enrolled or home schooled. That number is what they are required to provide to the State as far as resident students are concerned. Amstein said when you look at actual enrollment numbers, including those that are “tuitioned-in,” the count shows about 1,643 students, which includes preschoolers. That includes about 140 kindergarteners. He said they are down a little bit in the 4-year old preschool program, and 6 or 7 students in the Special Education preschool program. Amstein says those numbers typically go up before the Spring count.

In the Fall of 2012, there were 1,611 students.

8AM Newscast 10-29-2013

News, Podcasts

October 29th, 2013 by Chris Parks

w/ Ric Hanson

Play

2 injured during Shelby County ATV accident Monday

News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

Sheriff’s officials in Shelby County say two people were hurt when the ATV they were riding went out of control, traveled up an embankment and hit a utility pole in the Elk Horn City Park. The accident happened at around 6:30-p.m, Monday.  The ATV’s driver, 19-year old Maisie Williams, of Atlantic, and her passenger, 18-year old Angel Knowles, of Elk Horn, were ejected from the machine. Both women were transported by Elk Horn Rescue to the Cass County Memorial Hospital in Atlantic.

Williams was later flown by helicopter to the University of Nebraska Medical Center for treatment of serious injuries. Knowles suffered minor injuries, was treated and released. The accident remains under investigation.

(8-a.m. News)

Audubon City Council changes waste/recyclables contractor

News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The Audubon City Council, Monday, voted to accept a bid from Monte Drehr for the collection of residential solid waste and recyclables. Audubon Mayor Clarke “Sam” Kauffman told KJAN Dreher’s bid will save the City $28,200 over the course of the next three-years.

Dreher’s bid was $99,800 per year, while Bohlmann & Sons, who have been the City’s contractor for about the past 8-years, was $109,200 per year. The three-year contract with Dreher begins on January 1st, 2014.

7AM Newscast 10-29-2013

News, Podcasts

October 29th, 2013 by Chris Parks

w/ Ric Hanson

Play

Iowan pleads not guilty to vehicular homicide

News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

ONAWA, Iowa (AP) – A 44-year-old western woman has pleaded not guilty for a crash that killed her uncle.  Sioux City television station KTIV says Judith Krohn, of Mapleton, is charged with felony vehicular homicide while driving intoxicated. The accident occurred April 20 along Iowa Highway 141 near Mapleton. Authorities say Krohn was driving when her vehicle left the road on a curve and rolled into a ditch.

Her uncle, 59-year-old Albert Butler, of Mapleton, was partially ejected. He was pronounced dead later at a hospital.

Red Oak woman arrested on drug & other charges Tue. morning

News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

A traffic stop in Red Oak early this (Tuesday) morning resulted in an arrest. According to the Red Oak Police Department, 24-year-old Amanda Kate Carlson, of Red Oak, was arrested in the 400 block of North 4th Street.  Carlson faces charges that include driving while barred, possession of drug paraphernalia, and interference with official acts.

She was brought to the Montgomery County Law Enforcement Center and held on $2,000 cash bond.

Neighbors harvest fields after farmer’s death

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

EARLHAM, Iowa (AP) — More than a dozen farmers worked with six combines to harvest a crop near the central Iowa community of Earlham, a little more than a month after the owner died of cancer. Dave Boyle, of Earlham, told KCCI-TV, “That’s what neighbors are here for.” The farmers decided to help out after 64-year-old Dennis Scar died of lung cancer on Sept. 25.

The harvest normally would have taken days to complete, but the volunteers finished it in about three hours, Monday. Scar’s daughter-in-law, Nikki Scar, says the sight of the machinery pulling in brought her to tears. She says, “We’re just very blessed to have family and friends and live in a small town I guess.”

Harvest moved ahead quickly last week

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The corn and soybean harvest moved ahead quickly in the last week. The latest U-S-D-A report shows 20-percent of the corn crop was harvested last week and 17 percent of the soybeans. That puts the bean harvest two days ahead of normal — marking the first time all season soybean progress was ahead of the five-year average.

Pam Johnson farms with her husband in north central Iowa ’s Floyd County. She says she’s thankful that the weather has been favorable at the end of the season after the way it started. The spring was cold and wet spring — leading to a very small planting window — and to get the corn in Johnson says they planted both night and day for three days and the beans didn’t go in until June. “It’s been a struggle all the way along, and then of course, mother nature shut the rain off in August,” Johnson says. But Johnson says they’re now really pleased that they’ve had a long growing season. “We were afraid of all the things that could happen, we would have an early frost and we have not, so the weather has been good to us at the back end of the growing season and we’re pleasantly surprised by the yields that are out there despite the weather,” according to Johnson.

Fifty-five percent of the corn has now been harvested, which is five percentage points behind normal. Moisture content of all corn in the field was estimated at 21 percent while moisture content of corn harvested was 19 percent. The soybean harvest is now 87-percent complete.

(Radio Iowa)

King urges private negotiations over contentious Farm Bill details

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 29th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

Tomorrow (Wednesday) Republican Congressman Steve King and Democratic Senator Tom Harkin will meet for the first time with the 38 other members of a House-Senate “conference committee” appointed to come up with a Farm Bill compromise.  “I’m glad that we have two Iowans that are conferees,” King says. “We are now and have been for some weeks working to line up those issues that we disagree between the House and the Senate and line them up in order of difficulty.” According to King, the dispute over federal funding for “food stamps” is the most difficult to resolve.

House Republicans have voted to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by 40 billion. The bipartisan Farm Bill that cleared the Democratically-led Senate in June called for four billion in cuts to the food stamp program — 10 times less. King has asked House Republicans leaders to present him some “creative ideas” for bridging that 36-billion dollar divide. “I don’t want to tip any hand on it. I chair the subcommittee that deals with nutrition and so what I say — it might affect the negotiations,” King says. “But I want to get to the end of this thing and I want a bill on the president’s desk I said before the snow flies. I know in part of Iowa I’m already too late on that, but we’re going to try to get this done and I think we get it done by the end of the year.”

There are a variety of other proposals that are unresolved as well, like a so-called “payment cap” that bars farmers with an adjusted gross income above 750-thousand dollars from getting federal subsidies to buy crop insurance. King is urging other members of the conference committee to negotiate the details in private rather than in public. “Let’s sit down and see if we figure out how we can agree before any of us take such a public position that we can’t compromise or back up from it,” King says.

If the Farm Bill doesn’t pass congress by January 1st, farm policies will revert to the 1949 Farm Bill and the first impact consumers would see would be a dramatic increase in milk prices. King made his comments during a weekend appearance on Iowa Public Television’s “Iowa Press” program.

(Radio Iowa)