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3 arrested last weekend on drug charges in Clarinda

News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

(Correction to charges issued to Wiebeseik & Bergren by Chief Brothers)

Clarinda Police Chief Keith Brothers today (Friday), released details about a drug bust conducted in his community last weekend. Brothers says at around 3:50-a.m. August 9th, Clarinda Police Officers responded to a loud party/noise complaint at 422 N. 17th Street. The residence is rented by 21-year old James Kinghorn, of Clarinda.

Kinghorn was arrested for delivery of a controlled substance believed to be marijuana. Also arrested at the residence was 21-year old Brodie Lee Bergren, and 23-year old Jared Daniel Wiebesiek, both of Clarinda. They were charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance.

All three men were booked into the Page County Jail and held while awaiting initial appearances before the Page County Magistrate. The matter has been referred to the Page County Attorney’s Office for review and the formal filing of charges.

Homemade maple syrup tops the ‘cakes this weekend

News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

A pancake feed featuring homemade maple syrup will be held in Pottawattamie County this weekend. Botna Bend Park located outside of Hancock will be the site of the big breakfast from 8:30- until 11-a.m., Saturday. Park Ranger Jon Fenner says your free will donation breakfast will leave you feeling full. “We’ll have good hot coffee in the morning, orange juice and then pancakes, pure maple syrup and we get sausage from Gress Locker. They donate sausage every year.”

Making homemade maple syrup is a process that starts earlier in the year. “Right after winter, late February early March when the trees are coming out of their dormant period they start to bring up the sap from the ground and it is all the stored food that they have in their roots that they bring up. We tap the trees and able to take some of the sap that has some of that sweet sugar, maple flavor and we take that down and boil it to make syrup.”

Fenner says it takes 40 to 50 gallons of sap to produce just one gallon of syrup. During the breakfast, tickets will be sold for the fundraiser raffle to benefit the children’s craft program at Botna Bend with the top prize being a handmade quilt created by Botna Bend Park volunteers.

Other prizes include a jar of homemade maple syrup, a hand crafted bird feeder and two chances for a free weekend of camping at Botna Bend. Tickets are $1 each or 6 tickets for $5. Botna Bend Park is located at 42926 Mahogany Road near Hancock. Visitors can take exit 40 off Interstate 80 then south 8 miles on U.S. Highway 59 and follow the signs to the park. For more information, contact Botna Bend Park at 712-741-5465 or online at www.pottcoconservation.com.

(Joel McCall/KNOD)

Digital replica of Iowa Constitution is online

News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – A digital replica of the Iowa Constitution is now available online for public viewing. Secretary of State Matt Schultz said Friday that the document from 1857 had been scanned so that a replica could be provided online. Previously, people could only see the original beneath glass in the Secretary of State’s office at the State Capitol.

The constitution – which features 40 pages of hand-written text – was digitized through a partnership between Schultz’s office and the State Library of Iowa. The library bought a $23,000 scanner a year ago to use on fragile documents.

State officials said they hope the public will enjoy being able to look over the historic document. The digital version of the Iowa Constitution is on the State Library of Iowa’s website.

Cass Supervisors approve the purchase of two new motor graders

News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

The Cass County Board of Supervisors today (Friday) approved the purchase of two new, 2013 model-year motor graders for the Secondary Roads Department. Their decision followed a report from County Engineer Charles Marker, on test drives, fuel consumption and other factors associated with a John Deere model 770-G, Volvo, Caterpillar (“CAT”) 2013 12M2 and 2014 12M3 graders. Marker said his recommendation on the purchase of two “CAT” 12M2’s from Ziegler for a total of $287,352 (with trade-in’s), was based partly on input from his motor grader operators.

Caterpillar Model 12M2/M3 motor grader

Caterpillar Model 12M2/M3 motor grader

The operators discussed and created a list of pro’s and con’s for each grader they tested, which included the ability to stand up and sit down inside the cab, visibility (of the blade and behind the grader), whether it was equipped with steering wheel or “joy stick” steering and controls, along with other factors.

When it came down to the nuts and bolts of each of the machines tested, Marker said the CAT 12M2 would use less fuel, and unlike the John Deere 770G, it does not require an expensive fuel additive necessary to make the machine EPA compliant on emission controls.

Cass County cracks down on “mudders” – 3 cases went to court

Ag/Outdoor, News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

You may recall last November, KJAN News mentioned the Cass County Board of Supervisors had authorized County Engineer Charles Marker to work with County Attorney Dan Feistner, in an effort to draft a Resolution it’s hoped would put a little more “bite” into a State law penalizing those who use 4-wheel drive vehicles to tear up County dirt roads after it rains. Today (Friday), Feistner told the Board of Supervisors the efforts of law enforcement has resulted in action being taken against some of the parties responsible for the damage.stelprdb5097804

Feistner said there have been convictions and/or guilty pleas made in association with the Criminal Mischief charges filed against three individuals who “played” in the mud with their 4-wheel drive vehicles on Level B roads. If Probable Cause is established, Feistner said other charges will continue to be filed against persons who destroy dirt roads, which become muddy during periods of heavy or consistent rain. The individuals who have already been convicted or plead guilty to the offense are being required to pay restitution to the Secondary Roads Dept.

Supervisor Mark Wedemeyer wanted to make clear that farmers who are using the roads to get to their crops are not the ones being charged with destroying the roads. Feistner agreed. He said the incidents in question were clearly intentional, whereby the trucks “fishtailed” down the road one-quarter mile or more and could not be retrieved by conventional means. He said they obviously had not entered the road by mistake and simply got stuck.

Feistner said also, if it had been a farmer, they wouldn’t have run from law enforcement.
Anyone who sees an obvious case of “Mudding” on county roads, is urged to call law enforcement with a description of the vehicle, direction of travel, and if possible, a license plate.

In other business, the Board approved a Resolution placing a Public Measure on the Nov. 4th General Election ballot. The measure calls for the appointment of township officers by the Board of Supervisors, rather than by election. Auditor Dale Sunderman points out 14 townships are now by appointment by the Board. The change would affect Edna and Union Townships.

John Deere to cut 600 jobs, most in central Iowa & Quad Cities

Ag/Outdoor, News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

After reporting a deep drop in quarterly earnings earlier this week, Deere and Company now plans to lay off more than 600 workers at four of its manufacturing facilities, including one in central Iowa and two in the Quad Cities. Deere spokesman Ken Golden says the job cuts will be coming at the Des Moines Works in Ankeny, at the Harvester Works in East Moline, Illinois, the Seeding and Cylinder Works in Moline, Illinois, and at the plant in Coffeyville, Kansas.

“The largest number on today’s announcement is from the John Deere Harvester Works in East Moline,” Golden says. “That’s about 425 employees at that location. Des Moines is going to have 110 employees on indefinite layoff.” Deere is Iowa’s largest manufacturing employer and the company announced third quarter earnings on Wednesday of 850-million dollars, down 150-million from a year ago. Ag equipment sales dropped eight-percent in the U-S and Canada, 11-percent globally.

“We are always going to align the size of our manufacturing workforce with the market demand for our products,” Golden says. “Our employees are aware of that and so there is going to be some flux in the size of the workforce.” There are two ways the company makes adjustments, Golden says, like with extended shutdowns at each facility based on what’s being produced there.

“For instance, in Des Moines, all of the employees will be on an extended shutdown through September 29th,” Golden says. “When we place someone on an indefinite layoff, as we have done today, we are not projecting a particular date that they will be called back. That’s the unfortunate thing.” Deere is also implementing a seasonal shutdown affecting most of the manufacturing workforce at its Ottumwa Works. Production will be cut in the fourth quarter to meet market demand, which Golden says, is “not anything new for us.” Deere revised its full-year earnings projection to three-point-one billion dollars, compared to its spring prediction of three-point-three billion.

(Radio Iowa)

(Podcast) 8-a.m. News, 08/15/2014

News, Podcasts

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

With KJAN News Director Ric Hanson.

Play

Sam’s Club program awards grants for western IA child care & growth projects

News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

Officials with The Sam’s Club Giving Program say they’ve awarded a $500,000 grant to First Children’s Finance to provide finance and management assistance to child care businesses in Iowa and Minnesota. In Western Iowa the new Guided Growth project will focus on child care growth and quality by offering community facilitation, child care provider training, and comprehensive business assistance to help child care providers grow and improve their business quality, viability and sustainability, which leads to high-quality child care and education for all young children and families.

The program launches this month with a series of kick off events. The purpose of the events is to get local child care providers, community members and business leaders together to inform them of the opportunity.

The kick off events hosted by First Children’s Finance, Sam’s Giving Program, and Child Care Resource & Referral will be held:
• Tuesday August 19 in Clarinda
• Wednesday August 20 in Council Bluffs and Harlan
• Wednesday August 27 in Sioux City
• Thursday August 28 in Spencer and Fort Dodge

For more information on the Guided Growth project and specific times and locations for the kick off events, visit www.firstchildrensfinance.org/guidedgrowth or contact Angie Rae Duncan with First Children’s Finance at 515-229-5064.

(Podcast) 7:07-a.m. News & funeral report, 8/15/2014

News, Podcasts

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

With KJAN News Director Ric Hanson.

Play

Pigs, cows and votes: Candidates try for farm cred

Ag/Outdoor, News

August 15th, 2014 by Ric Hanson

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — For candidates in the Midwest, almost nothing tops a photo opportunity with a barnyard animal or a colorful anecdote about life on the farm. Take Mary Burke, a former business executive running as a Democrat for governor in Wisconsin, who recently paused to check out the cows at a county fair. Or Illinois venture capitalist Bruce Rauner, who talks about his dairy farmer grandfather as a role model in his Republican bid for governor.

And then there is Iowa U.S. Senate candidate Joni Ernst, who gained national attention with an ad touting her hog castration skills. Most voters in these states don’t work on farms. Most candidates don’t either. But many of those seeking office seem to be stretching farther than ever for a barnyard background to establish common-man authenticity.