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2 Griswold students’ egg recipes place in top 5 contest

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 14th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Two students from Griswold had their egg recipes place in the top 5 during the Iowa Egg Council’s “Incredibly Good Eggs” Recipe Contest, held May 4th at Iowa State University, in Ames. Neve Perdue took 1st place in the Student Division, with her Spring Vegetable Egg Drop Soup. Her recipe earned her the top honors and a $500 cash prize. Tina Perdue, placed 5th with her “North African Baked Eggs with Chickpeas and Feta,” recipe.

The top 5 winners in each category, adult and student, were judged by a panel of experts, with the recipes being scores on taste, appearance, originality, and use of eggs in their dish.

Visit iowaegg.org on the web for the recipes created by the Perdues and other contestants.

U.S. Senate candidate calls for reclassification of marijuana

News

May 14th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

A Democrat who is hoping to challenge U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley in November is calling on the Republican to clear the way for a vote on making marijuana more readily available for medical use. State Senator Rob Hogg says legislation pending in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which Grassley chairs, would reclassify medical cannabis from Schedule I to a Schedule II substance.

“It is time for Senator Grassley to put aside the delay and the gridlock,” Hogg said. “This is something Americans across our state and our country want him to act on.” A spokesperson for Grassley’s office issued a statement to Radio Iowa saying Grassley has “serious concerns” with the bill because it “could be a pathway for those who want broad legalization of marijuana for all purposes.”

Hogg spoke about the bill, known as the CARERS Act, at a pharmacy in Urbandale. He was joined by supporters of the bill, including the parent of a child who have epilepsy and a patient who suffers from chronic pain. “Who are we to say no? Who is Senator Grassley to say no? It’s time to say yes to people who want the opportunity to try medical cannabis to alleviate their medical conditions,” Hogg said.

Maria La Franz of Des Moines has been lobbying lawmakers for several years now, hoping to legally obtain cannabis for her son, who suffers from severe epilepsy. Seventy-eight-percent of Iowans want the option for medical use of the cannabis plant,” La Franz said. “Some of our children in Iowa are benefitting from cannabis, but we are still — federally — breaking the law.” The figure La Franz cited comes from a Des Moines Register Iowa Poll released in March. It found 78-percent of the Iowans surveyed favor allowing people to use marijuana as medicine.

Hogg, who has been a member of the Iowa legislature since 2003, is one of three Democrats seeking their party’s nomination for the U.S. Senate in 2016. The other candidates are Bob Krause and Tom Fiegan, who both also ran for the Senate in 2010, but lost to party nominee Roxanne Conlin in the primary.
…………….
full statement from Grassley’s office:

Because of Senator Grassley’s work, federal agencies are conducting scientific and medical analysis of cannabidiol to see if there is a scientific basis to change its schedule, and agencies have eased some of the regulatory barriers to cannabidiol research. Senator Grassley believes the government has to ensure both public safety and the effectiveness of drugs available for patients, but at the same time, it shouldn’t delay medical innovations that could help children or others.

The CARERS Act goes far beyond the issue of cannabidiol for epilepsy-suffering patients. It would make access to recreational and smoked marijuana much easier for many people through sweeping changes to federal marijuana and banking laws. Among other things, it would place all medical marijuana authorized by state law (as well as all cannabidiol oil derived from the marijuana plant) outside the purview of the Controlled Substances Act.

Iowa does not permit smoked marijuana as medicine, and smoking marijuana for medical purposes isn’t approved by leading medical authorities. In addition, the bill also would change federal banking laws to permit state-authorized marijuana businesses, including recreational marijuana businesses, to use banks and other financial institutions. Many of the businesses that want to become mainstream recreational marijuana sellers want the legitimacy of using banks.

The bill could be a pathway for those who want broad legalization of marijuana for all purposes. With marijuana users being much more likely to take up heroin and other serious drugs than non-users, and with more infants being born with marijuana exposure lately, Senator Grassley has serious concerns with recreational marijuana legalization and legislation that would pave the way for such legalization.

(Radio Iowa)

Vape shops could vanish under new FDA rules

News

May 14th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The F-D-A now classifies e-cigarettes as tobacco products and the liquid that goes into the devices will be regulated. Some fear it’ll mean the end of the small, privately-owned vape shops that have cropped up around Iowa. Sam Salaymeh runs vape shops in Sioux City and Omaha and says he and other store owners are still attempting to grasp the new regulations.

“We’re trying to fight but we’re trying to orient ourselves and understand all of these regulations and how to navigate,” Salaymeh says. “I have at least one to challenge this. There are a lot of advocacy groups trying to educate, raise awareness and rally support.” While the feds claim there are no complete studies on the dangers of vaping, Salaymeh says there’s a large report out from the Royal College of Physicians in London which touts the many benefits.

“They talk about its efficacy for people to switch from smoking to vaping,” he says. “They talk about the issue that smoking is the biggest avoidable cause of death. They talk about how electronic nicotine delivery systems are a better way to get the nicotine that people are addicted to without getting all of the other stuff that comes with tobacco.” Salaymeh says vaping has helped thousands of people kick the cigarette habit. He says the difference between vaping and smoking is like comparing bicycles to the space shuttle.

“These devices are at least 95% safer than traditional cigarettes,” Salaymeh says. “This is where this gets quite interesting. From a public health perspective, if anything on Earth has ever come up as something that reduces harm by 95%, all politicians will be applauding it and hailing it as the best thing since sliced bread.”

The new rules take effect in 90 days. They prohibit the sale of e-cigarettes in vending machines and prevent owners from offering free samples to customers. The sale of e-cigs will also be banned to anyone under 18, while the makers of the devices will be required to register with the F-D-A, provide a list of ingredients and apply for permission to sell them. Salaymeh says the new rules will eliminate all small vape shops and hand the industry over to big tobacco companies.

(Radio Iowa)

Iowa early News Headlines: Sat., May 14th 2016

News

May 14th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Here is the latest Iowa news from The Associated Press at 3:40 a.m. CDT

BEVINGTON, Iowa (AP) — A head-on crash has injured three people and blocked the northbound lanes of Interstate 35 south of Des Moines. Iowa State Patrol Sgt. Nathan Ludwig says the crash happened Friday afternoon just outside Bevington, about 20 miles south of Des Moines. Ludwig said three people were injured in the two-vehicle crash, which happened in a construction zone. The state patrol initially said one person had died but later said that wasn’t correct.

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (AP) — Cedar Rapids is conducting an inventory of its street-side trees in order to evaluate the plants’ health. KCRG-TV reports that the city hired California-based ArborPro to assess the trees for $189,000. A city arborist says knowing how diverse its urban canopy is and the population numbers of its different species will allow the city to lay out a more exact plan for when and how it’ll remove ash trees, which are currently threatened by the emerald ash borer.

MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa (AP) — The school district superintendent in Bettendorf has been chosen to head the school district in Marshalltown. The Marshalltown Community School District has offered Theron Schutte a contract, and the school board is expected to make the hiring official Monday. Schutte, who graduated from Marshalltown High School in 1981, will begin his new job July 1.

WATERLOO, Iowa (AP) — Police say a man is in critical condition after being shot multiple times in Waterloo. Authorities say Black Hawk County Sheriff’s Deputy Harold Oliver was on his way to work Thursday morning, when he saw 40-year-old Andrew Spates shot multiple times as he sat in a car in a Kwik Star parking lot.

Vehicle stolen from Red Oak is recovered

News

May 13th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

A vehicle reported stolen from Red Oak, today (Friday), was recovered, but authorities still need your help in finding the person or persons responsible for the theft. The dark red, Chevy Impala was stolen sometime between 10:30-a.m. and 1-p.m., from the 2200 block of Eastern Street in Red Oak, but later found abandoned.

Anyone with information about the crime is asked to call Red Oak Police at 712-623-6500.

Bridge closure on US 71 in Audubon County begins May 31st

News

May 13th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The Iowa Department of Transportation’s Creston Construction Office reports, weather permitting, a bridge deck replacement project on the U.S. 71 bridge over the Nishnabotna River one mile south of Iowa 44 in Audubon County will require closing of the bridge to traffic, from Tuesday, May 31st, until mid-September. Motorists will be detoured at U.S. 71 and Interstate 80 using Iowa 44 and Iowa 173.

The Iowa DOT reminds motorists to drive with caution, obey the posted speed limit and other signs in the work area, and be aware that traffic fines for moving violations are at least double in work zones. As in all work zones, drivers should stay alert, allow ample space between vehicles, and wear seat belts.

Creston teen cited following Sunday accident

News

May 13th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Creston Police today (Friday) said a teen received two citations following a hit-and-run accident Sunday morning. Officials say 16-year old Tyreese Goodwin, of Creston, was cited for Reckless Driving, Failure to hold a valid driver’s license and failure to show proof of insurance. The citations were the result of an investigation into an accident at the intersection of W. Adams Street and Sumner Avenue.

The collision happened at around 9-a.m., Sunday, as a car driven by 70-year old Linda Huffman, of Creston, was waiting at a stop light. An SUV driven by Goodwin was traveling north on Sumner Avenue and turning left onto Adams Street, when the vehicle hit Huffman’s 2005 Buick on the rear passenger door. Goodwin then fled the scene, but officers were able to locate him and the 2005 Chevy Trailblazer he was driving.

Damage from the collision amounted to $6,500.

Former Sioux City law firm employee pleads not guilty

News

May 13th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) – A woman accused of stealing more than $38,000 from a Sioux City law firm has pleaded not guilty. Court records say Kristen Hermelbracht entered a written plea to the theft charge Wednesday, and her trial is scheduled to begin July 5th.

Authorities say that between July 2013 and November 2015, she stole the money by forging a partner’s signature on the law firm’s checks. She also is accused of using the firm’s money to buy prepaid debit cards.

Atlantic law firm announces new Associate Atty.

News

May 13th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

The law firm Otto, Lorence & Wiederstein, P.L.L.C. would like to welcome Mark Bosworth as their new Associate Attorney. Mark comes from Marks, Clare & Richards law firm in Omaha. He graduated from the Creighton University School of law in 2014. Mark and his wife, Dusti, are originally from Logan, Iowa; joining them in Atlantic are their three daughters, Briley (5), Nora (4) and Claire (2). Mark joins the practice along with David Wiederstein, Jody Lorence, and John Otto.

Atty. Mark Bosworth

Atty. Mark Bosworth

Mark’s career in the legal field began in 2009 when he joined the Douglas County Child Support Office as a caseworker specializing in enforcement and collections. While working for the Child Support office, Mark was responsible for the management of over 1,000 cases; serving as the primary contact for clients. During this time, Mark developed a passion for problem solving and for helping clients and families navigate through the legal system. After seeing various issues and problems which required the skills of a private attorney, Mark enrolled at the Creighton University School of Law in the Fall of 2011.

While at Creighton, Mark focused his studies in Litigation. He graduated from Creighton with a designation as Lyle E. Strom Scholar in Trial Advocacy and earned a degree concentration in litigation. Mark earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa in 2008, with a double major in English and Journalism.

In his free time Mark enjoys spending time with his wife and daughters. Mark also enjoys watching Hawkeye sports and maintaining an active lifestyle.

Water Works federal lawsuit trial delayed to June 2017

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 13th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – The lawsuit filed by the Des Moines Water Works in federal court against several upstream agriculture drainage districts has been delayed by nearly a year. Originally scheduled for trial in August, a judge rescheduled the three-week trial for June 26, 2017.

Water Works Board Chairman Graham Gillette says that will give the Iowa Supreme Court time to resolve constitutional questions the federal judge posed to it prior to trying the case. Gillette says a delay also gives state leaders time to reconsider providing money for agriculture practices that would reduce water pollutants.

The water utility for about 500,000 central Iowa customers blames farmland runoff for high levels of nitrate that cost millions of dollars to remove. Water Works officials want farm drainage districts regulated under the federal Clean Water Act.