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Nishna Valley Trails work day and ride

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Officials with the Nishna Valley Trails association said Monday the organization is sponsoring it’s second “Friends of the T-Bone” trail work day this coming Saturday, May 19th , from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.  Organizers say interested members of the public are invited to come to the trail crossing at Lorah, one mile west of US Highway 71, about a mile south of “The Valley” truck stop.

The goal is to once again clear out dead branches from the right-of-way, and stack them by the trail for the County Conservation staff to run through the chipper. Persons interested in volunteering are advised to wear a good pair of shoes, long pants, some sturdy gloves, and a hat to ward off sun and bugs. Bottled water will be provided so you can stay hydrated. If it rains that morning, the event will be postponed to a later date.

At 11:00-a.m., or when the work is done, whichever comes first, there are tentative plans for the work group to gather at the Valley trailhead and take a bike ride together. Volunteers can travel along with the group to Darrell’s Place in Hamlin for lunch. Or, if you prefer not to go so far, you can stop at the Little Red Barn in Exira, or Big T’s Bar and Grill in Brayton.

Cass County Conservation Director Micah Lee said he was very pleased with what the groups’ efforts accomplished on the last clean-up day, May 5th .  Lee and his crew plan to be out on the trail this weekend to chip the branches volunteers work to pile-up along the trail.

Survey shows rent for Iowa farmland up 18 percent

Ag/Outdoor, News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

WATERLOO, Iowa (AP) — The rent for farmland in Iowa has increased 18 percent from last year, reflecting continued strong demand for corn and soybeans. The Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Cash Rental Survey shows the average cash rent for corn and soybean ground in Iowa was $252 an acre per year. Agriculture experts think rates will continue to climb next year despite moves in Congress to end direct commodity payments to farmers. The survey is based on more than 1,400 responses, primarily from farmers, landowners, lenders and professional farm managers. Rents have been climbing for years. In 2008, for example, the statewide rental averaged $176 an acre.

Barn Fire reported south of Atlantic, Monday

News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Atlantic Firefighters were called to the scene of a barn fire this (Monday) afternoon, about a mile and a-half south of town. The call from the Calvin Knop farm at 58748 630th Street (Highway 71), came in at 2:55-p.m.

Barn Fire south of Atlantic, Monday.

Several sheep were housed in the barn, but they were moved out before firefighters arrived, and buckets were being used to douse the area where smoke was seen. Atlantic Fire Department 2nd Assistant Fire Chief Tim Cappel told KJAN News when the first crews arrived there were no visible flames coming from the building. Upon further investigation, they did discover charred, smoldering wood in the upper floor near a corner of the barn, where  electricity comes into the building.

Cappel said Brown Electric arrived and quickly shut off the power. They were also working to fix the problem with an apparent electrical short. Cappel said there was minimal damage to the structure.

Firefighters were on the scene for about 35-to 40-minutes. There were no injuries, and none of the animals were harmed.

Anita teen injured by runaway car Friday

News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Sheriff’s Officials in Cass County say an Anita teen was injured Friday evening during a single-vehicle accident on Chestnut Street, in Anita. A car operated by 17-year old Shaley Kay Winther was parked in a driveway and began to roll because the vehicle was not in “Park.” Winther attempted to stop the 1994 Pontiac Grand Am, but was knocked down by the vehicle. 

The car traveled through the corner of a yard, across 6th Street and struck a power pole, which snapped-off and fell on the vehicle. Winther suffered minor injuries and was transported by Anita Rescue to the Cass County Memorial Hospital, where she was treated and released. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $3000, while the power pole sustained about $1000 damage. 

The Sheriff’s Office reports also, 50-year old Casey Renee Bates, of Red Oak, was arrested Saturday, on a District Court warrant for Failure to Appear for a Child Support Hearing. Bates was taken to the Cass County Jail where she was being held on $2000 cash bond.

Injuries reported following Page County accident

News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

The Page County Sheriff’s Office says three people suffered “possible” injuries during an accident late last week near Shenandoah. Sheriff Lyle Palmer says 16-year old Breanna Studey and 35-year old Shelly Boulton, both of Shenandoah, along with 13-year old Ieisha Jabbar, of Coin, were transported to the Shenandoah Hospital. 

Palmer says Studey, who didn’t have a driver’s license, was driving a 1994 Chevy Blazer eastbound on 220th Street at around 7:45-p.m. Friday, when she lost control of the SUV and overcorrected, sending it into the east ditch off of “F” Avenue, where the vehicle rolled over. All three of the females were wearing their seat belts. 

The Sheriff’s report says Studey was driving too fast for conditions. She was cited for Failure to possess a driver’s license, no proof of insurance, and failure to maintain control. The SUV sustained $2,000 damage during the crash.

8AM Newscast 05-14-2012

News, Podcasts

May 14th, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Ric Hanson

Play

7AM Newscast 05-14-2012

News, Podcasts

May 14th, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Ric Hanson

Play

Minor injuries reported following accident in Shenandoah

News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Authorities in Page County say one person suffered minor, “possible” injuries during an accident Sunday afternoon, in Shenandoah. Sheriff’s Officials say 22-year-old Georgia Adams, of Shenandoah, was wearing her seat belt. She was transported to the Shenandoah Medical Center following the crash of her car on “A” Avenue, just north of Highway Two. 

Sheriff Lyle Palmer says Adams was traveling north towards Shenandoah at around 4:30-p.m, when she lost control of her vehicle, which left the road and hit a residential driveway, before flipping twice end-over-end, and coming to rest on it’s wheels. The Sheriff’s report said Adams may have fallen asleep or fainted due to fatigue, prior to the crash. Adams was cited for failure to maintain control. The 1997 Buick Regal she was driving sustained $3,500 damage.

Study looks at long term impact of Wal-mart on small towns

News

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

A new study by Iowa State University economists shows small towns in Iowa that saw a Wal-Mart move in had moderate increases in sales 15-years later. Economist Ken Stone, became an expert on the study of the impact of the retail giant before retiring from I-S-U in 2004. He co-authored the new study and says Wal-Mart came into many of the towns 25-years ago as they were seeing population and sales declines.  “Even though towns that got a Wal-Mart store get an initial surge in sales, they start going down, and earlier we found that sometimes the go down more than what they were when (Wal-Mart) first came in. We attributed that to too many Wal-Mart stores too close together,” he explains. “What we concluded after this study was — that’s still true — but it was a lot better than if they had continued on the trend line they had been on before.” Stone says they also found the small towns that didn’t get a Wal-Mart to move in, didn’t see everyone leave to shop elsewhere.

“Even though they were at a little lower level, they sort of stabilized. And I attribute that to what I call the capitalism at work. We had companies like Hy-Vee and Fareway locate in those towns and we had Alco and Dollar Generals and so on,” Stone says. He says he has always gone by the premise that people don’t want to leave town to shop, and the smaller stores that filled the gaps in the non-Wal-Mart communities took advantage of that idea. Stone says the research shows the small stores in the Wal-Mart communities that tried to go head to head with the big retailer in areas like sporting goods and pharmaceuticals, did not survive. But he says those who adapted and offered something different have been able to make it.

“And it could be more upscale merchandise or specialty categories. Even hardware stores, if they’re handling more fasteners and tools and things (and provide) better service than what Wal-mart has, they’re doing okay,” according to Stone. “So there’s pluses and minuses others benefit from the additional traffic that Wal-Mart brings in if they are selling something different.” Stone says he can’t take all the information and make one general statement on the impact of Wal-mart on small towns.”So if a town has local option sales taxes for example…then they’re going to benefit from the additional sales. So that’s a plus. On the negative side, there’s a lot of environmental impacts. Many of these super centers take 20 or 30 acres and that’s can create drainage problems, and parking problems, and traffic problems and all kinds of things. So, it’s really hard to say yes or no it just depends on the local situation,” Stone says.

The study looked at 28 Wal-Mart host towns and 22 non-Wal-Mart control towns with populations between three and 30-thousand people. Stone says he doesn’t know of a study that’s taken such a long look at the impact of Wal-Mart. Stone, who is now a professor emeritus, co-authored the study with assistant economics professor Georgeanne Artz for publication in a future issue of Economic Development Quarterly.

(Dar Danielson/Radio Iowa)

Share the Road, It’s Bike to Work Week in Iowa

Ag/Outdoor, News, Sports

May 14th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Iowa motorists will notice more two-wheelers on the road this morning as part of Bike to Work Week. Whether it’s for exercise, to save money or to live a greener lifestyle, Iowa Bicycle Coalition executive director Mark Wyatt says plenty of people are turning to pedal power, and not just for a week. He encourages Iowans to give biking to work a spin.  “A lot of times your commute is much shorter than you can even imagine and it’s pretty comparable by car,” Wyatt says. “It’s easy. If you really want to start, give it a try it on a weekend and get out there and see how long your commute’s going to be and help with your timing and such.” Common complaints are that people don’t want to be all sweaty when they get to work, or that their hair will be messed up from wearing a bike helmet.

“You can take your clothes to work,” Wyatt says. “Hair products are portable so it’s really easy to set up there at work, towel off and change clothes before you go on about your day.” One study found that biking to work instead of driving a car can save six-to-seven-thousand dollars a year. While the winter months pose a challenge in Iowa, Wyatt says there’s no valid excuse to not try biking to work this spring — and this week. “We have 1,600 miles of trails available for people to use and countless number of bike lanes that are starting to pop up in urban areas,” Wyatt says. “As far as bike friendliness, we’re ranked #6 so there’s plenty of opportunities you can get out and bike on facilities designated for bicycles.” In the ten years since his organization started promoting Bike to Work Week in Iowa, Wyatt says the number of participants has grown from a few hundred to several thousand statewide. He says it’s easy to get involved and before you get on the road, you can start online.

“Go to www.bikeiowa.com or www.iowagoesbybicycle.com,” Wyatt says. “We have a national bicycle challenge that we’re participating in so users can log their miles and keep track of how long it takes to get to work and how much fun you’re having along the way.” There are a host of rides, races and other bike-related events over the coming weeks as part of National Bike Month.