KJAN Ag/Outdoor

From County extension to conservation to grain prices, we provide lots of information every day on KJAN.  Here is some of that information on the web too!  We hope you find it useful.

Town says Tyson makes it hard to find new use for its plant

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 10th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

CHEROKEE, Iowa (AP) – Leaders in the northwest Iowa town of Cherokee would love to see another company make use of the former Tyson Foods plant just outside town, but they say the food company is making it hard to find a new tenant. The Des Moines Register reports Tyson continues paying $130,000 rent on the building and refuses to allow anyone it considers a competitor to use the building.

Tyson spokeswoman Caroline Ahn says the company has been in talks with three food companies about the plant. She says those deals fell apart, but it was not because of competitive concerns. Cherokee City Councilman Chad Brown says it feels like Tyson is holding the town hostage because it won’t release the plant.

Omaha woman during Lake Manawa PWC incident

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 10th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Officers with the Iowa DNR are looking for the operator of a Personal Water Craft (PWC) following a personal injury accident that occurred at Lake Manawa Saturday evening. Brian Smith, with the DNR says an Omaha, Neb. woman was injured after being thrown off a PWC on Lake Manawa, and law enforcement officers are seeking assistance from the public in locating the operator of the vessel who left the scene.

29-year old Laura Goodburn was the passenger on a personal watercraft when she was thrown off at approximately 6:30-p.m., Saturday in the middle of the lake toward the south end. She complained of a neck injury and was taken to Alegent Health Mercy Hospital in Council Bluffs. Both Goodburn and a friend she was with, Justin Smith of Omaha, Neb., told law enforcement officers they did not know the identity of the personal watercraft operator.

The operator of the personal watercraft is described as a white, middle-aged male, approximately 6-feet tall, average weight and with short red, blonde or gray hair. At the time of the incident, he was wearing an O’Neill life jacket. The personal watercraft was described as being orange, black and gold. Law enforcement officers searched the lake and boat ramps but were unable to find a vessel fitting that description.

Conservation officers and park rangers from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources are continuing to investigate the incident. Anyone who witnessed the incident or has information on the identity of the personal watercraft operator is asked to call DNR Law Enforcement Supervisor Brian Smith at 712-254-0550.

Iowa official says drought conditions are short term

Ag/Outdoor, Weather

July 8th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

You can thank reserves built up at the end of last year for keeping Iowa in good shape water wise following a dry June. The areas impacted by drought have increased in the most recent report, but Tim Hall with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources says it could be a lot worse. “If you ignored the fall of 2015, we would be in a bit of jam right now. It’s been somewhat dry — especially in parts of the state — but I think we’re still benefiting from the really wet November and December we had, given the rainfall that’s fallen in this first half of the year,” Hall says.

The Iowa average streamflow index dropped below the normal line on July 4th. Hall says the level is tracked on a daily basis and it has been above normal since May of 2015. “That speaks more to how wet it has been recently than how dry it is now,” Hall says. “So that index has just now gotten down to the normal line…so it mostly tells us how wet it has been for quite awhile.” Parts of the state have moved into moderate drought conditions, but Hall is not worried.

“We’re a long ways away from being overly concerned,” he says. The moderate drought level is the first level, and Hall says it could easily turn around. “It’s a pretty short-term deal, because if you look a the long-term climate prediction information — there’s not long term drought predicted for that part of the state out through the end of September,” Hall explains. “So, even the climate folks are looking at this as a short-term impact.” Areas of the state have struggled with low water levels in the last few years appear to be doing okay now.

“Part of the state where we’ve been consistently concerned has been in the northwest corner of the state. And they have actually done pretty well precipitation wise this year,” Hall says. “So, if there was any part of the state where we would want to be particularly concerned it would be up there. But they’ve been running in the first half of the year much about normal for rainfall. So, they are in pretty good shape.” Hall says swings in weather pattern can always make a difference in the water situation.

“You’re always on that sort of razor’s edge between too wet and too dry. For quite awhile in the state we’ve been really running right down the middle where we want to be. And really, that’s where we are right now,” according to Hall. You can find out more about Iowa’s water trends at: www.iowadnr.gov/watersummaryupdate.

(Radio Iowa)

Local Rainfall Totals ending at 7:00 am Friday, July 8

Ag/Outdoor, Weather

July 8th, 2016 by Jim Field

  • KJAN, Atlantic  .15″
  • 7 Miles NE of Atlantic  .18″
  • Elk Horn  .19″
  • Missouri Valley  .07″
  • Logan  .12″
  • Oakland  .1″
  • Woodbine  .23″
  • Irwin  .23″

Superintendent Named for Iowa State University Research Farms in Southwest Iowa

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 8th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

AMES, Iowa — The research farms Iowa State University operates in southwest Iowa have a new leader. ISU says Dallas Maxwell has been named superintendent of the Armstrong and Neely-Kinyon research and demonstration farms located near Lewis and Greenfield, respectively. The farms are owned by the Wallace Foundation for Rural Research and Development, a multi-county association of farmers and agricultural businesses, which leases the farms to Iowa State.

Dallas Maxwell

Dallas Maxwell

Maxwell has served as interim superintendent since October when Bernie Havlovic, the original superintendent, retired. He also has worked with the beef cattle activities at the farms since 1998. Maxwell is an Iowa State alumnus, earning a bachelor’s degree in animal science in 1977.

The Neely-Kinyon farm is managed as a satellite of the Armstrong farm, which is the location of the Wallace Learning Center. Research at the farms focuses on corn/soybeans, beef cattle, soil management and a variety of other agricultural topics. The farm’s staff includes Randy Breach, Dan Schaben and Jim Rogers who, along with Maxwell, support 75 research projects including on-farm trials and hosts more than 2,000 visitors a year.

Ag Secretary says crops looking good overall

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 7th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Iowa Agriculture Secretary Bill Northey says the state entered July with the crops looking good despite some fields that need some moisture. “We have a lot of areas that look pretty good, but we do definitely have some dry area in parts of Iowa — especially across southern Iowa,” Northey says.

The weekly U-S-D-A crop report showed south-central and south-east Iowa had the lowest levels of topsoil moisture with two-thirds of the state short to very short. There have been reports of the corn leaves curling in some places where the moisture is low. Northey says the hot days in the 90s will make the corn leaves curl and the soybeans will wilt a little bit. He says in the areas where it is not really dry the crops will be able to handle the heat.

Northey farms near Spirit Lake in northwest Iowa and got some of his corn in late due to wet conditions. “And it only made knee high by the Fourth of July, so we have spots that are drowned out and not very far away we have spots that are too dry,” according to Northey. ” For the most part when you look at the state, the crop looks good for this time of year.” Northey says he’s only had a few reports of issues with the crops outside of the weather.

He says he’s seen some soybean aphids being talked about as people get out and scout the fields. But he says there’s not been anything major. Northey says storm damage is one thing that could impact crops in July. He says the impact of storms is much like the impact of rain, as it can hit one field hard, but leave others untouched.

(Radio Iowa)

Local Rainfall Totals at 7:00 am on Thursday, July 7

Ag/Outdoor, Weather

July 7th, 2016 by Jim Field

  • KJAN, Atlantic  .77″
  • 7 NE of Atlantic  .92″
  • Massena  .76″
  • Elk Horn  .8″
  • Avoca  1″
  • Oakland  .75″
  • Neola  .5″
  • Irwin  .73″
  • Council Bluffs  .67″
  • Villisca  2.55″
  • Clarinda  1.5″
  • Shenandoah  2.24″
  • Sidney  2.23″
  • Schleswig  1.07″
  • Missouri Valley  .64″
  • Logan  .85″
  • Woodbine  .72″
  • Creston  1.15″
  • New Market  1.76″

Court backs jail time for egg executives in salmonella case

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 6th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – A federal appeals court has upheld jail sentences for two egg industry executives whose Iowa company caused a nationwide salmonella outbreak in 2010. In a long-awaited decision, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday backed the three-month jail sentences issued last year to Austin “Jack” DeCoster and son Peter DeCoster.

U.S. District Judge Mark Bennett sentenced them last year, citing a “litany of shameful conduct” that happened at their large egg-production company. But Bennett allowed them to their freedom they appealed the sentences, which the DeCosters argued were unconstitutional and unreasonable. Business groups took up their cause.

In a 2-1 decision, an appeals panel ruled that the DeCosters “are liable for negligently failing to prevent the salmonella outbreak” and that jail time is appropriate.

Check your sunscreen to make sure its still good

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 6th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

There’s been some cloudy and cool weather in some areas of the state to start the month of July, but there’s still a lot of summer left. Iowa Department of Public Health medical director, Patricia Quinlisk says you need to remember to use sunscreen when heading out. You can sometimes use the same sunscreen you had last year if it appears to still be good. She says the bottles usually have a date that tells you how long you should keep it around.

But doctor Quinlisk says there are some cases where that date might not be the best guide. “I think if it’s been there awhile — especially if you’re like me and you keep things out in your garage where it goes through the cold of the winter and the heat of the summer — that it probably is not a bad idea to just get new,” Quinlisk says, “that way you know that it is going to be working at its peak effectiveness and you will be protected.”

She says takes a look at your stock of sunblock to be sure it hasn’t expired before you head out, so you can stay protected from the sun.

(Radio Iowa)

Omaha-Council Bluffs metro ozone levels are higher than normal this week

Ag/Outdoor, News

July 6th, 2016 by Ric Hanson

Residents of the Omaha-Council Bluffs area who have breathing troubles like asthma may find it particularly difficult to be outside for very long during the day this week. Greg Youell, executive director of the Metropolitan Area Planning Agency, says there are higher concentrations of ground-level ozone, thanks to the steamy weather and pollution. “Ground level ozone is formed when you have the combination of emissions and sunlight and hot temperatures,” Youell says. “Our ozone season typically tracks with baseball season. It’s in the hotter months and these hot summer days is when the ozone could be really high.”

Health officials say readings in Omaha-Council Bluffs will be in the upper end of the moderate range of the Federal Air Quality Index. Despite the ozone issues, Youell says the air quality is usually quite good though the levels are now “teetering on the edge” of the limits. “We don’t want to go into what’s called non-attainment,” he says. “If we did that, it could end up being a big burden on our entire area. It could mean having to do inspections for our vehicles which can lead to more costly repairs for our cars. Also, it limits the ability to some of our businesses to expand and attract new businesses in the area.”

Youell says there are small things residents can do to help reduce the ozone levels. “Limit trips as you’re driving around,” he says. “Carpool or take the bus, walk and bike. Moving the lawn is one thing you want to avoid or at least do it during the cooler hours of the day. The same with refueling your vehicle. If you can do that at dusk or nighttime, that helps to reduce the amount of fuel that’s lost through evaporation.”

Other suggestions include: shutting off your car if you plan to idle it for longer than 30 seconds and sealing all containers that contain paint, cleansers, solvents and other chemicals.

(Radio Iowa)