KJAN Ag/Outdoor

From County extension to conservation to grain prices, we provide lots of information every day on KJAN.  Here is some of that information on the web too!  We hope you find it useful.

Event on ISU campus celebrating all things bacon

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 18th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The smell of bacon will permeate the campus of Iowa State University tomorrow (Saturday). The first ever ISU Bacon Expo is being held in the courtyard of the Scheman  Center. Bacon Expo student co-chair Kristin Liska is a senior at ISU studying animal science, with a minor in journalism.ISU BACON EXPO logo “The idea was founded by our College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Student Council President (Jake Swanson)…bacon is a hot topic right now and it’s just a way to showcase agriculture in general,” Liska says.

Iowa is the top pork producing state in the country. About 30 million hogs are raised in the state each year. Liska says there will be 21 tents filled with vendors and student clubs offering a wide variety of bacon – everything from traditional bacon to bacon cupcakes. “I’ve heard of jalapeño bacon, Cookie’s barbecue bacon, and a maple sugar-pepper bacon that our ISU meat lab is doing,” Liska says.

The event will also include live music and a contest with the theme, “How Do You Wear Your Bacon?”  Liska says the Iowa State Fashion Show has “paired” with the expo and will hold a contest with participants given one hour to construct an outfit made out of bacon on a model. The fifteen-hundred (1,500) tickets for the event went on sale September 6 and sold out in two days.

The inaugural ISU Bacon Expo will run from 1-5 p.m. tomorrow. Liska says discussions are already underway for another Bacon Expo next year.

(Radio Iowa)

Leash on Life 10-17-2013

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 17th, 2013 by Chris Parks

Andrea Farrior and Chris Parks talk about the latest information and animals available for adoption at the Atlantic Animal Shelter.

Play

Doc Leonard’s Pet Pointers 10-17-2013

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 17th, 2013 by Chris Parks

w/ Dr. Keith Leonard

Play

Salesman took $480K in bribes from Iowa farmer

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 16th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – A former manager at one of the nation’s largest grain cooperatives has reached a plea agreement on charges that he accepted $480,000 in bribes from an Iowa farmer in exchange for deep discounts on crop seed. Chad Hartzler, former sales manager at West Central Co-Op in Ralston, is scheduled to appear in federal court in Sioux City for a plea hearing Thursday.

He was charged last week with wire fraud. His attorney, Chris Cooklin, said Wednesday that his client has reached a plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the detail of which have been filed under seal. A charging document says Hartzler accepted $480,000 in bribes from 2005 to 2011 from Lake View farmer Bill Wollesen.

Wollesen hasn’t been charged and denies any wrongdoing, saying the payments weren’t bribes.

Cass County Extension Report 10-16-2013

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 16th, 2013 by Chris Parks

w/ Kate Olson

Play

Iowa cattlemen encouraged to share thoughts on E15, Country of Origin labeling

Ag/Outdoor

October 16th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The President of the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association is calling on members to share their opinions on a host of issues prior to the ICA’s policy meeting in December. Ed Greiman (GRY-man) of Garner says one of the hot topics up for debate among cattlemen involves ethanol and the Renewable Fuels Standard. The ICA has historically supported the ethanol industry, but with talk of increasing the percentage of ethanol in gasoline, Greiman wants to know if that support is still there.

“The real question I have of our members is…do we support the mandate maybe going to 15-percent? We hear a lot of rumblings about that and I do believe that debate is going to happen sometime in the next year,” Greiman says. Ethanol is made from corn and some livestock producers are concerned that a move to E-15 will raise the cost of feed. “I would like more direction from our members,” Greiman says. “How do they feel about increasing the mandate?”

Another issue is Country of Origin Labeling on meat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Department is pushing for labeling to be mandatory, while many in the cattle industry want labeling to be voluntary. Greiman wants to hear from Iowans on that issue as well. “I just want to make sure that we have policy in place at the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association that represents what Iowa cattlemen, across the state, really are thinking,” Greiman says.

Association members are encouraged to call the ICA state office in Ames, and share their opinions, at (515) 296-2266. The ICA’s annual policy meeting is scheduled for December 9th through the 11th in Altoona.

On the web at www.iacattlemen.org

(Radio Iowa)

Atlantic School Board learns about CASE

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 15th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The Atlantic Board of Education heard a presentation Monday night from High School Ag Instructor and Atlantic FFA Advisor, Eric Miller. Miller spoke with regard to the district’s proposed CASE curriculum. CASE stands for Curriculum for Agriculture, Science and Education.Miller says the concept is for science- or inquiry-based learning. More specifically, it focuses on math and science, and how those areas relate to agriculture.

Atlantic H.S. Ag Instructor Eric Miller.

Atlantic H.S. Ag Instructor Eric Miller.

He says the curriculum allows a student to see the benefits of math and how it pertains to their agricultural experience. Miller says students sometimes don’t realize how important math is for their careers, whether it’s in agriculture, other industries and trades. He says the program involves student-led agriculture, also. Miller says students have to learn how a process works and find the answer to a question that they develop on their own, through the scientific process.

The program is offered in a year-long course, which Atlantic has not had in quite a while. Miller said it’s a nod back to “The old style of teaching agriculture.” One of the topics is AFNR (Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources), an entry level course. Later offerings may include animal and plant sciences. Miller says the curriculum goes along with the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) courses many schools are teaching, and is aligned with national Ag standards as well as the Iowa Core curriculum.

The big issue he says is the cost. In order for Miller to attend the 10-day certification course, 8-hours per day, is $2,500 plus $10,000 for books and materials. He says some of the equipment can be borrowed from the Science Department at the high school, to save cost, but some will need to be purchased throughout the year. Miller says he has also applied for a $5,000 grant from Pioneer. The CASE curriculum is currently being offered in the Audubon and Griswold School Districts, but is not yet offered in Atlantic.

Shelby County Fire Danger remains “Moderate”

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 14th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The Shelby County Emergency Management Agency has updated the fire danger warning signs in the county. Emergency Coordinator Bob Seivert says the signs will stay in the moderate category to start the week. He says showers forecasted this morning did not materialize and the winds are once again strong out of the southeast.

The winds will elevate the danger of a wild fire spreading quickly while also gaining fuel by creating drying conditions. The Shelby County EMA will update the situation again on Thursday.

State will use $250,000 federal grant for “blender” pumps

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 14th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

The State of Iowa will use a 250-thousand dollar federal grant to bolster a program that pays gas stations to install “blender” pumps that incorporate a higher percentage of corn-based ethanol in motor fuels. Most Iowa stations offer a 10 percent ethanol blend. Governor Terry Branstad says the goal is to boost usage of a 30 percent blend. “It’s my understanding that 30 percent is kind of the ‘sweet spot’ in terms of the best fuel efficiency with an ethanol blend,” Branstad says.

Iowa Ag Secretary Bill Northey says the expanded sale of E-30 will help Iowa maintain its leadership position in the ethanol industry. “Not only on the production side, but on the consumption side,” Northey says. E-30 is not approved for use in all vehicles, just the 10 percent of U.S. vehicles that are “flexible fuel” models. Some of the federal grant money will be used for blender pumps the dispense “bio-diesel” which features a soybean-based fuel additive.

Gas station operators and farm co-ops that sell fuel will be able to apply for the grants for blender pumps this spring. Representatives of Iowa’s petroleum and renewable fuels industries attended Governor Branstad’s news conference this morning (Monday) for the “fueling our future” program announcement. “Unlike Washington, D.C. where they’re always fighting and you have this big clash going on between ‘Big Oil’ and renewable energy, we actually have petroleum marketers and the renewable energy association cooperating here in Iowa, working together,” Branstad says. “And obviously that’s very beneficial to our economy, to our farmers and also to our environment.”

There are 41 ethanol plants in Iowa and 25 percent of the ethanol produced in the U.S. comes from Iowa. About 17 percent of the country’s biodiesel comes from the dozen biodiesel plants here.

(Radio Iowa)

King sees “momentum” for Farm Bill

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 12th, 2013 by Ric Hanson

Congressman Steve King says procedural steps taken in the U.S. House Friday afternoon are a hopeful sign for the Farm Bill. King expects the house speaker soon will appoint a handful of members of the House to a conference committee that will work with a small group of senators to hammer out a final version of the legislation. “I think the momentum of this thing is moving in the direction of getting closer to get a Farm Bill done,” King says. “Each step along the way we get closer, but it’s been a long and frustrating process.” Congress began soliciting input for a new Farm Bill over two years ago.

“It has been the longest process of any bill that I can think of,” King says. A temporary extension of the current Farm Bill expired September 30th and American agriculture has been operating without any Farm Bill provisions in place since October 1st. King believes a new Farm Bill can be passed in congress yet this year.

(Radio Iowa)