KJAN Ag/Outdoor

From County extension to conservation to grain prices, we provide lots of information every day on KJAN.  Here is some of that information on the web too!  We hope you find it useful.

Rural Issues roundtable discussion to be held in Corning Oct. 25th

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 18th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Local residents, business owners and community leaders are invited to share their thoughts about opportunities and challenges in rural Iowa, during a Rural-Issues Roundtable Discussion in Corning, on October 25th. The discussion, featuring USDA Rural Development State Director from Iowa, Bill Menner, will run from 1-to 2:30-p.m. next Thursday, at the Corning Public Library (603 9th St.), in Corning. The meeting is open to the public.

Burn Bans lifted for Madison and Carroll Counties

Ag/Outdoor, News, Weather

October 18th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

The State Fire Marshals Office and Iowa Department of Public Safety report Burn Bans which had been in place for Carroll and Madison Counties, were lifted this week. The bans on open burning due to the extremely dry summer conditions, were enacted in late July. Recent rains and current climate conditions prompted officials in Carroll and Madison Counties to ask for their burn bans to be rescinded. The ban was lifted in Madison County this (Thursday) morning, while the Carroll County burn ban was lifted Tuesday afternoon. And, as mentioned earlier, a burn ban in Pottawattamie County, was also rescinded, on Wednesday.

Leash on Life 10-18-2012

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 18th, 2012 by Chris Parks

Info on animals up for adoption at the Atlantic Animal Shelter.

 

Doc Leonard’s Pet Pointers 10-18-2012

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 18th, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Dr. Keith Leonard

USDA Report 10-18-2012

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 18th, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Denny Heflin

Burn Ban lifted in Pottawattamie County

Ag/Outdoor, News

October 17th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Officials with the Pottawattamie County Emergency Management Agency say the ban on open burning that was in place for the entire county, has been lifted, as of 10- a.m. today (Wedensday, October 17th, 2012). The extremely dry seasonal conditions prompted a three-month burn ban for Pottawattamie County.  EMA Director Doug Reed said in a Press Release, that “The burn ban was a necessary tool to help reduce the potential for widespread, devastating fires throughout the county.”

The Fire Departments in Pottawattamie County and the 9-1-1 Communications Center implemented automatic mutual aid procedures that gave firefighters an edge in responding to reported fires quickly and efficiently. Reed said “Their performance was outstanding and made a dangerous season safer for all our citizens.”

And, although the ban is lifted, Reed says all citizens are urged to use caution whenever burning and to ensure they have water or other protective measures in place to prevent the spread of fires. Citizens living within incorporated city limits should check with their local fire department or city clerk before burning. Some communities have their own ordinances that restrict or prohibit open burning throughout the year.

Anyone conducting a controlled burn is encouraged to report their burn, prior to ignition, by calling the 911 Communication Center’s NON-EMERGENCY number at 712-328-5737.

Cass County Extension Report 10-17-2012

Ag/Outdoor, Podcasts

October 17th, 2012 by Chris Parks

w/ Kate Olson

Smithsonian hosts US youth summit on Dust Bowl

Ag/Outdoor, Weather

October 17th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

WASHINGTON (AP) – Students in nine states and the nation’s capital are preparing to examine the legacy of the Dust Bowl and the current impact of drought on agriculture and global food security.  The Smithsonian and the National Endowment for the Humanities are holding a national youth summit for middle and high school students Wednesday. It will include a discussion with scholars and experts, along with segments from filmmaker Ken Burns’ upcoming documentary, “The Dust Bowl.”

The summit will be webcast from the National Museum of American History in Washington to nine Smithsonian affiliate museums and the National Steinbeck Center. Regional town halls will be held in Nebraska, Texas, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Oklahoma, South Dakota and California.  Educators and students can join the webcast online for free.

Artist selected to create Borlaug statue

Ag/Outdoor

October 17th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

An artist from Aberdeen, South Dakota has been selected to create a statue of a famous Iowan for display in Washington, D.C. Last year, the Iowa legislature and Governor Branstad approved the move to place a statue of 1970 Nobel Peace Prize winner Norman Borlaug in the U.S. Capitol Building’s National Statuary Hall. Jeff Morgan, spokesperson for the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, says 33-year-old Benjamin Victor was selected by a committee to create the likeness of Borlaug after reviewing resumes and proposals from 65 artists from around the world.

Borlaug clay statue

Victor will be working to install the statue in March of 2014 – around the time of what would have been Borlaug’s 100th birthday. Borlaug, a native of Cresco, died in the fall of 2009 at the age of 95. Borlaug was a plant scientist who developed new strains of wheat. He’s credited with saving up to a billion people from starvation around the world. Morgan says Victor, the artist, has developed a maquette – or scale model – of the statue, which features a young Borlaug writing in a notebook and standing in front of wheat plants.  “The process will be to develop the clay model and from there it will be sent to a foundry to be cast and made into bronze with a patina applied to it,” Morgan said. “It will then be transported to the U.S. Capitol Building for the installation.”

The selection of the artist for the Borlaug statue was announced Tuesday as the World Food Prize festivities were getting underway in Des Moines. The annual award was created by Borlaug in 1986 as a way to honor individuals who’ve worked to improve the quality and quantity of food around the world. Borlaug’s likeness will replace the statue of a Civil War hero from Iowa that was placed in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall in 1903. That statue of U.S. Senator James Harlan, the one-time president of Iowa Wesleyan College in Mount Pleasant, will be moved to the Iowa capitol in Des Moines. Each U.S. state is allowed to have statues of two “notable citizens” on display in the U.S. Capitol.

Borlaug statue sketch

The Borlaug statue will join a statue of Samuel Kirkwood, who served as governor of Iowa during the Civil War. The creation and installation of the Borlaug statue is being financed through a private fundraising effort.

(Radio Iowa)

Climatologist: weekend rains barely put dent in drought

Ag/Outdoor, News, Weather

October 17th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Most of Iowa got a good soaking last weekend, but it didn’t go far in terms of making up for the drought. State Climatologist Harry Hillaker says far northwest Iowa didn’t receive any rain, while the heaviest downpours were scattered around the state. Areas of northeast Iowa, around New Hampton and Decorah, received three-and-a-half to four inches of rain. Similar rainfall totals were reported around Red Oak, Greenfield and Winterset in southwest Iowa, and near Centerville, Albia and Oskaloosa in southeast Iowa. In Atlantic, we received 1.93-inches of rain over the weekend.

Statewide, on average, the weekend system dumped one-and-a-half inches of rain. It marked the single biggest rainfall event in Iowa since early May. “This one event over the weekend was almost as big as what we had for the whole month of September,” Hillaker said. Despite the downpour, Hillaker notes we’re a long way from bringing an end to the 2012 drought.

“We’re still roughly eight-and-a-half inches below normal for the year to date, as far as statewide average,” Hillaker said. “We did trim about an inch off the deficit we had going before this last rain event. So, it’s not a huge impact as far as reducing our deficit, but it will have quite a positive impact on soil moisture levels.”

(Radio Iowa)