K.C. Chief’s Football News…

Sports

December 7th, 2012 by Ric Hanson

Chiefs running back Peyton Hillis responded tersely to comments by former teammate Joe Thomas, likening him to a “crazy ex-girlfriend” who won’t move on. Thomas, the Browns’ offensive tackle, said Wednesday that Hillis didn’t always play hard during his time in Cleveland. He referred to Hillis as “toxic” and accused him of putting his contract situation ahead of the team. The Chiefs visit the Browns on Sunday. Hillis responded Thursday by saying, “Joe Thomas, he can have his opinions all he wants. It’s kind of like a crazy ex-girlfriend, you know? It’s been over a year. Get on with it.” Hillis said it’s easy for Thomas to rip others for seeking a new contract when “you get paid $100 million by one team.”

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In the final days of Jovan Belcher’s life, he could have taken advantage of numerous avenues for support provided by the Kansas City Chiefs and the NFL. There are hotlines established by the league that connect players, staff and their families with third-party counselors unaffiliated with the NFL or its teams. There are also numerous symposiums and support personnel whose jobs are to ensure the well-being of the players. But as many players suggested, having support available is only half of the equation. They must also take advantage of it, and that means a willingness to admit when they have problems. Said Chiefs offensive lineman Ryan Lilja: “The resources the league and the teams offer are always good, it’s just up to guys to take advantage of it.”

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A relative of the slain girlfriend of Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher says she was a loyal friend who brought joy to others with her smiles and laughter. Kasandra Perkins’ great-uncle also told mourners at a service Thursday that Perkins loved her family and considered her 3-month-old daughter, Zoey, to be the love of her life. Family and friends gathered at a rural North Texas church to remember the 22-year-old Perkins, five days after Belcher killed her then shot himself in the head. A white casket bedecked with a spray of white lilies was the mourners’ focal point at Ridgeview Family Fellowship in Blue Ridge, about 40 miles northeast of Dallas. Great-uncle Ted Downing said Perkins “had a deep, deep understanding about the important things in life.”